Maxwell School

Institute for Qualitative and Multi-Method Research – June 15-26, 2015

Schedule and Reading List  

(download pdf version)

There are three types of institute sessions: (1) Unified (whole institute) sessions; (2) research design discussion groups; and (3) elective modules. The unified sessions are on the first Monday (6/15) and the last first Friday (6/26). 

The research design discussion groups will be held for two hours on most mornings of the institute. A separate schedule will be available. 

There are 27 elective modules, of which participants will select eight. That is, for each of the eight days on which there is a choice, participants will select one of the two modules offered as doubles (e.g. modules 4 or 5), as triples (e.g. modules 1, 2 or 3) or as quadruples (e.g. 6, 7, 8 or 9). 

Monday, June 15 

Unified (whole institute) sessions on the foundations of qualitative and multi-method inquiry:  Andrew Bennett, Colin Elman, Jason Seawright, David Waldner, and Lisa Wedeen.

Tuesday, June 16

Module 1, Regression and Case Studies—Jason Seawright

Module 2, Typological Theorizing and Inferences on Causal Mechanisms—Andrew Bennett and David Waldner

Module 3, Textual and Audio-Visual Analysis—Lisa Wedeen and James Chandler

Wednesday, June 17 

Module 4, Process Tracing—Andrew Bennett and David Waldner

Module 5, Ethnography I— Frederic Schaffer and Timothy Pachirat

Module 6, Natural Experiments I—Thad Dunning and Daniel Hidalgo

Thursday, June 18 

Module 7, Qualitative and Comparative Methods I—James Mahoney and Gary Goertz

Module 8, Archival Research and Elite Interviewing—James Goldgeier, Andrew Moravcsik, Elizabeth Saunders

Module 9, Ethnographic Methods II—Frederic Schaffer and Timothy Pachirat

Friday, June 19 

Module 10, Natural Experiments II—Thad Dunning and Daniel Hidalgo

Module 11, Qualitative and Comparative Methods II—James Mahoney and Gary Goertz

Module 12, Managing and Sharing Qualitative Data and Making Qualitative Research Transparent—Louise Corti and Diana Kapiszewski

Module 13, Ethnographic Methods III—Frederic Schaffer and Timothy Pachirat

Monday, June 22

Module 14, Computer-Assisted Content Analysis I—Will Lowe and Sven Oliver Proksch

Module 15, Qualitative Comparative Analysis/fs I—Charles Ragin and Carsten Schneider

Module 16, Designing and Conducting Fieldwork: Preparing and Operating in the Field—Diana Kapiszewski and Lauren MacLean

Tuesday, June 23 

Module 17, Computer-Assisted Content Analysis II—Will Lowe and Sven Oliver Proksch

Module 18, Qualitative Comparative Analysis /fs II—Charles Ragin and Carsten Schneider

Module 19, Designing and Conducting Fieldwork: Collecting and Analyzing Data—Diana Kapiszewski and Lauren MacLean

Wednesday, June 24 

Module 20, Mixed-method research and causal mechanisms, part 1—Nicholas Weller and Jeb Barnes

Module 21, CAQDAS I introduction to Atlas.ti—Robert Rubinstein

Module 22, Geographic Information Systems I: Introduction to GIS as a Qualitative Research Method—Jonnell Robinson

Module 23, Interpretation and History, part 1—Thomas Dodman and Daragh Grant

Thursday, June 25 

Module 24, Mixed-method research and causal mechanisms, part 2—Nicholas Weller and Jeb Barnes

Module 25, CAQDAS II  Introduction to Atlas.ti—Robert Rubinstein

Module 26, Geographic Information Systems II—Exploring Analytic Capabilities, Jonnell Robinson

Module 27, Interpretation and History II: Interpretive Methods for Archival and Historical Research—Thomas Dodman and Daragh Grant

Friday, June 26

Unified (whole institute) sessions on policy relevance, obtaining funding, getting published, and institute conclusion—Peter Feaver, Colin Elman, Brian Humes, John Ishiyama.


Choosing Which Modules to Take

While many of the 27 modules can be taken as stand-alone units, there are some limitations on selections. 

Modules with higher numbered suffixes (e.g. Content Analysis II) can usually only be taken with the first module in the sequence (e.g. Content Analysis I). [That is, while it is often fine to take I and not II in a sequence, it is usually not possible to take II and not I.] The exceptions to this rule are modules 11 Qualitative and Comparative Methods II, and 27 Interpretation and History II. (It is also possible to take Module 26 Geographic Information Systems (GIS) II without Module 21 Geographic Information Systems (GIS) I, but only if you already have some familiarity with GIS.) 

Modules 5, 9, and 13 (Ethnographic Methods I, II, and III) should be considered as a single unit, and accordingly can only be selected together (i.e. participants cannot take only Ethnographic Methods I, or I and II). 

Apart from these formal limitations, we should also note that there are several modules which follow in a natural sequence and/or lend themselves to being taken as a group. For the avoidance of doubt, we outline these informal sequences simply to help you navigate the table above. Beyond the two limitations we mention above, you may take whichever modules you would find most helpful.

Module 1 (Regression and Case Studies), Modules 6 and 10 (Natural Experiments I and II), and Modules 20 and 24 (Mixed-method research and causal mechanisms I and II).

Module 3 (Discourse Analysis), Modules 5, 9, and 13 (Ethnographic Methods I, II, and III), and Modules 23 and 27 (Interpretation and History)

Module 8 (Archival Research and Elite Interviews), Module 12 (Qualitative Data and Research Transparency), and Modules 16 and 19 (Designing and Conducting Fieldwork I and II).

Books to Purchase or Otherwise Obtain

The reading for some unified sessions and modules includes a book or books that must be purchased, or borrowed from your university library [please note that they are unlikely to be available at the Syracuse University bookstore or library].  You will also see that there is some overlap:  some books are used in more than one module. 

Manuscripts in Press or in Progress

To the extent possible, IQMR uses the most up-to-date readings on the methods covered at the institute. One consequence is that we are often using manuscripts that are either in press or in progress.  Please note that the authors are allowing us to use these materials as a courtesy. As with all IQMR materials, they are made available for current attendees’ use only. 


Monday, June 15 Unified Sessions, Andrew Bennett, Colin Elman, Jason Seawright, David Waldner, Lisa Wedeen

U1 9:30am – 10:00am – Introduction
Colin Elman, Syracuse University
 
U2 10:00am-10:45am Within Case and Small-N Comparisons
Andrew Bennett, Georgetown University

• U.2.1. Alexander George and Andrew Bennett, Case Studies and Theory Development in the Social Sciences (The MIT Press, 2005), Preface and chapter 1. (Book to purchase)
 
10:45am - 11:15 am Coffee Break
 
U3 11:15am – 12:00pm Statistical/multi-method Approaches
Jason Seawright, Northwestern University

• U.3.1. David A. Freedman, “On Types of Scientific Enquiry: The Role of Qualitative Reasoning.” In Janet Box-Steffensemeir, Henry Brady, and David Collier, eds., Oxford Handbook of Political Methodology (Oxford University Press, 2008), pp. 300-318.

• U.3.2. Evan Lieberman, “Nested Analysis as a Mixed-Method Strategy for Comparative Research,” American Political Science Review 99 (August 2005): 435-452.
 
12:00pm-2:15pm Lunch

U4 2:15pm - 3:00pm The Interpretive Approach to Qualitative Research

Lisa Wedeen, University of Chicago

• U.4.1. Clifford Geertz, "Thick Description: Toward an Interpretive Theory of Culture" in The Interpretation of Cultures (Basic Books, 1973).

• U.4.2. Clifford Geertz, "Deep Play: Notes on the Balinese Cockfight" in The Interpretation of Cultures (Basic Books, 1973).

• U.4.3. Michel Foucault, "The Body of the Condemned" in Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison (Vintage Books, 1995). (That's the second edition; the 1979 first edition is fine too).

• U.4.4. Michel Foucault, “Questions of Method.” In Graham Burchell, Colin Gordon, and Peter Miller, eds., The Foucault Effect: Studies in Governmentality(University of Chicago Press, 1991).
 
3:00pm – 3:30pm Coffee Break

U5 3:30-4:15 Interpretivism in an Age of Causal Inference
David Waldner, University of Virginia

• U.5.1. Peter T. Manicas, A Realist Philosophy of Social Science: Explanation and Understanding (Cambridge University Press, 2006): chapter 1, chapter 3 (through top of page 67 only).

 U6 4:15 - 5:15pm Roundtable on “How Do We Bring All of this Together?” The Implications of Multiple Approaches to Qualitative and Multi-Method Research, Lisa Wedeen, Andrew Bennett, Jason Seawright, David Waldner         
 


Tuesday, June 16 Module 1, Regression and Case Studies, Jason Seawright

8:45am - 10:15am Regression and Case Studies
Jason Seawright, Northwestern University

Most discussions of multi-method research involve combinations of regression and case-study methods. In this session, we discuss research designs that enhance the contribution of such combinations to causal inference. We consider ways that case studies can contribute to the study of causal pathways, but also ways to more directly test key assumptions for causal inference such as measurement validity and the absence of confounding variables. For each goal, we will discuss efficient case selection.

• 1.1.1 Seawright Multi-Method manuscript, Chapters 3-5

• 1.1.2 Evan Lieberman, “Nested Analysis as a Mixed-Method Strategy for Comparative Research,” American Political Science Review 99 (August 2005): 435-452.

10:15am - 10:45am Coffee Break.

10:45am - 12:30pm Research Design Discussion Sessions (not part of Module).
       
12: 30pm - 2:00pm  Lunch.                     
 
2:00pm - 3:30pm  Multi-Method Designs with Natural Experiments
Jason Seawright, Northwestern University

While much work on multi-method research focuses on regression-type studies of observational data, quantitative analysis in the social sciences often uses newer techniques that rely on different assumptions for causal inference. In this session, we will discuss multi-method designs in which the qualitative component uses matching, true natural experiments, or instrumental-variables natural experiments. We will focus in particular on ways that qualitative evidence can help test the special assumptions of these methods, as well as on efficient case selection for each.

• 1.2.1 Thad Dunning, Natural Experiments in the Social Sciences: A Design-Based Approach (Cambridge University Press, 2012), Chapter 11

• 1.2.2 Seawright Multi-Method manuscript, Chapters 6-7

3:30pm - 4:00pm Coffee Break.

4:00pm - 5:30pm Case Studies and Experiments
Jason Seawright, Northwestern University

While randomized experiments (whether in the field or the laboratory) are the gold standard for causal inference, they do not provide assumption-free causal insights. This last session focuses on effectively combining experiments and qualitative methods. Case-study methods can contribute to experiments by improving measurement, as well as testing key assumptions related to experimental realism and the complex form of independence called SUTVA. Experiments, in turn, can contribute to case studies by serving as a step in a process-tracing chain, by providing a set of contrasting outcomes to explain, or by quantifying effect sizes for causal inferences made qualitatively. We will discuss each of these designs, noting advantages, disadvantages, and practical considerations for each.

• 1.3.1 Elizabeth Levy-Paluck, The Promising Integration of Qualitative Methods and Field Experiments, Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 628, March 2010: 59-71

• 1.3.2 Seawright Multi-Method manuscript, Chapters 8-9


Tuesday, June 16 Module 2, Typological Theorizing and Inferences on Causal Mechanisms, Andrew Bennett and David Waldner

8:45am - 10:15am   Typologies and Typological Theorizing
Andrew Bennett, Georgetown University
 
• 2.1.1. Andrew Bennett, “Causal Mechanisms and Typological Theories in the Study of Civil Conflict.” In Jeff Checkel, ed., Transnational Dynamics of Civil War (Cambridge University Press, 2013), pp. 205‐231.

• 2.1.2. Colin Elman, “Explanatory Typologies and Property Space in Qualitative Studies of International Politics,” International Organization 59(2) (April 2005): 293‐326.  

Recommended

• 2.1.3. Alexander L. George and Andrew Bennett, Case Studies and Theory Development in the Social Sciences (The MIT Press, 2005), Chapter 11. (Book to purchase) 

10:15am - 10:45am Coffee Break.

10:45am - 12:30pm Research Design Discussion Sessions (not part of Module).
       
12: 30pm - 2:00pm  Lunch.                     
 
2:00pm - 3:30pm Typological Theory: Student Analysis of Examples.  
Andrew Bennett, Georgetown University

This session is designed to be interactive and its success depends on the work students put into preparing for it.  Students interested in presenting one or more one-page or one-slide diagrams or typological tables or theories (see the three questions below) for discussion in this session should email their diagram(s) to Professor Bennett at BennettA@Georgetown.edu   Students should read the two assigned articles whether or not they propose to present a diagram.  Students are especially encouraged to try question three and email the result to Prof. Bennett.

• 2.2.1. Reading 1: Jack Goldstone, “Understanding the Revolutions of 2011,” Foreign Affairs, May-June 2011. 

Question 1: Try depicting Goldstone’s argument as a typological theory on a single page or powerpoint slide.  

• 2.2.2. Reading 2: Henry Hale, “Divided We Stand: Institutional Sources of Ethnofederal State Survival and Collapse,” World Politics 56 (2004):  165-93.

Question 2: Try diagramming a typological theory that might improve upon Henry Hale’s theory.  What post-2004 cases might you choose to study to further test or develop his theory?

Question 3: Try diagramming a typological theory for the argument in your PhD thesis.  Identify where key cases in your population fit in the typology (even if based on preliminary knowledge of the cases).  What cases would you select to study and why?

Recommended: 

• 2.2.3. David Collier, Jody LaPorte, Jason Seawright “Putting typologies to work: concept formation, measurement, and analytic rigor,” - Political Research Quarterly, Vol. 65, no. 1 (2012), 217-232.

3:30pm - 4:00pm Coffee Break.
    
4:00pm - 5:30pm  Causal Mechanisms
David Waldner, University of Virginia
 
• 2.3.1. Steven Sloman, Causal Models: How People Think about the World and Its Alternatives (Oxford University Press, 2005): 3-66.


Tuesday, June 16 Module 3, Textual and Audio-Visual Analysis, Lisa Wedeen and James Chandler

This module provides students with an introduction to three different modes of discourse analysis. Participants will learn to "read" texts while becoming familiar with contemporary thinking about interpretation, narrative, and social construction. In these three sessions we shall explore the following methods: Foucault’s “interpretive analytics”; Wittgenstein’s understanding of language as activity and its relevance to ordinary language-use analysis (including theories of “performativity”); and an analysis of the rhetoric of cinema.

8:45am - 10:15am Wittgenstein and Ordinary Language-Use Analysis 
Lisa Wedeen, University of Chicago

This session introduces participants to Ludwig Wittgenstein’s thought and its relationship to ordinary language-use methods. We shall focus on several key ways in which Wittgensteinian-inspired methods can be used in ethnographic and analytical research. Among the questions we shall ask are: What is the “value added” of concentrating on language? Why is understanding language as an activity important? How can social scientists grapple with vexed issues of intention? What does “performative” mean, and how do political theories about language as performative differ from discussions of performance? How can social scientists uninterested in taking on new jargon use this kind of political theory to further their theoretical and empirical work? 

• 3.1.1. Hanna Fenichel Pitkin, “Justice, Socrates and Thrasymachus” in Wittgenstein and Justice: On the Significance of Ludwig Wittgenstein for Social and Political Thought (University of California Press, 1972).

• 3.1.2. Lisa Wedeen, Peripheral Visions: Publics, Power, and Performance in Yemen (University of Chicago Press, 2008), Chapter 2, chapter 3, and conclusion. (Book to purchase)

• 3.1.3. Ludwig Wittgenstein, The Philosophical Investigations, G. E. M. Anscombe, trans. (Blackwell Publishers, 2001), Paragraphs 1-33; paragraph 154; pages 194-195.

10:15-10:45am  Coffee Break

10:45am-12.30pm Research Design Discussion Sessions

12: 30pm – 2:00pm Lunch

2:00pm – 3:30pm The Rhetoric of Cinema:  Style, History, Politics
James Chandler, University of Chicago

In media cultures that have us increasingly reliant on motion-picture narratives for our sense of historical reality, both the proximate past and the distant, it is incumbent on contemporary scholarship, not least in the social sciences, to cultivate the requisite analytic skills for making sense of what we see.  Documentary filmmaking has become more visible than ever, and fiction filmmaking has increasing turned to work is labeled with the claim to be “based on actual [or true, or historical] events,” often involving a mix of documentary footage. This session will undertake to consider what Roland Barthes once called the “reality effect” in the case of films that claim to be making serious historical representations.  That is, we will be looking at what might be called the “history effect,” including the “documentary effect,” across a few key examples.  But beyond consideration of cinema’s reality effect, or effects, as such, we will also be looking at how filmmakers construct the past in a variety of stylistic registers, and how this different registers codify the past in a variety of ways.

• 3.2.1. James Chandler, “Cinema, History, and the Politics of Style:  Michael Collins and The Wind that Shakes the Barley,” Field Day Review 7 (2011)

• 3.2.2. J Michael Rogin, "The Sword Became a Flashing Vision": D. W. Griffith's The Birth of a Nation. In Representations, No. 9, Special Issue: American Culture Between the Civil War and World War I. (Winter, 1985), pp. 150-195.

Please also watch the three film associated with these two articles.

3:30pm - 4:00pm Coffee Break

4:00pm - 5:30pm Foucauldian Discourse Analysis 
Lisa Wedeen, University of Chicago

This session introduces participants to the techniques of Foucauldian discourse analysis or “interpretive analytics.” Participants will learn how to conduct a discourse analysis, what the underlying assumptions of such an analysis are, and how these techniques can be used to advance political inquiry. The session will consider both the power and limitations of the method, the ways in which it differs from other modes of interpretation, and its advantages over content analysis. 

• 3.3.1. Michel Foucault, “Nietzsche, Genealogy, History” in Language, Counter-Memory, Practice: Selected Essays and Interviews, Donald F. Bouchard, ed., Donald F. Bouchard and Sherry Simon, trans. (Cornell University Press, 1977), pp. 139-164.

• 3.3.2. Michel Foucault, The History of Sexuality, Vol. 1, Robert Hurley, trans. (Vintage Books, 1990), pp. 1-35 and pp. 92-114.

• 3.3.3 Revisit King, Keohane, and Verba’s Designing Social Inquiry and bring this text to class. Gary King, Robert O. Keohane, and Sidney Verba, Designing Social Inquiry: Scientific Inference in Qualitative Research (Princeton University Press, 1994).

Recommended

• 3.3.4. Hubert L. Dreyfus and Paul Rabinow, Michel Foucault: Beyond Structuralism and Hermeneutics (University of Chicago Press, 1983), Part Two.


Wednesday, June 17 Module 4, Process Tracing, Andrew Bennett and David Waldner

8:45am - 10:15am  Process Tracing: A Bayesian Approach 
Andrew Bennett, Georgetown University
 
• 4.1.1. Andrew Bennett, and Jeffrey Checkel, eds., Process Tracing in the Social Sciences (Cambridge University Press, 2014), Chapter 1 and the appendix.   (Book for purchase)
 
10:15am - 10:45am Coffee Break.

10:45am - 12:30pm Research Design Discussion Sessions (not part of Module).

12: 30pm - 2:00pm  Lunch.                     
 
2:00pm - 3:30pm Process Tracing and Causal Inference: Theory 
David Waldner, University of VIrginia
 
• 4.2.1. David Waldner, “Aspirin, Aeschylus, and the Foundations of Qualitative Causal Inference,” unpublished paper, University of Virginia, June 2015.

• 4.2.2. David Waldner, “What Makes Process Tracing Good: Causal Mechanisms, Causal Inference, and the Completeness Standard in Comparative Politics,” in Andrew Bennett and Jeffrey T. Checkel, eds., Process Tracing: From Metaphor to Analytic Tool (Cambridge University Press, 2014): 126-152.  (Book for purchase)

Recommended:

• 4.2.3. David Waldner, “Process Tracing and Causal Mechanisms” in Harold Kincaid, ed., The Oxford Handbook of the Philosophy of Social Science (Oxford University Press, 2012): 65-84.

 
3:30pm - 4:00pm Coffee Break.
    
4:00pm - 5:30pm   Process Tracing Exercises.  Split into two groups:
 
--David Waldner  

• 4.3.1. Theda Skocpol, “France, Russia, China: A Structural Analysis of Social Revolutions,” Comparative Studies in Society and History 18 (April 1976): 175-210.

• 4.3.2. James Mahoney, “Nominal, Ordinal, and Narrative Appraisal in Macrocausal Analysis,” American Journal of Sociology 104 (January 1999): 1154-1169.

• 4.3.3. John Owen, “How Liberalism Produces Democratic Peace,” International Security 19 (Autumn 1994): 87-125.

--Andy Bennett 
 
• 4.3.4. David Collier, “Understanding Process Tracing,” PS: Political Science and Politics 44(4) (October 2011): 823‐830, and associated exercises (online at http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1944646)


Wednesday, June 17 Module 5, Ethnography I, Frederic Schaffer and Timothy Pachirat

Overall Description

How does sustained attention to meaning making in the research world contribute to the study of politics? What are the promises, and perils, of social research that invites the unruly minutiae of lived experience and conceptual lifeworlds to converse with, and contest, abstract disciplinary theories and categories? In this practice-intensive short course, we explore two ethnographic methods - participant observation and ordinary language interviewing - with specific attention to their potential to subvert, generate, and extend understandings of politics and power.

Session 1 (8:45am - 10:15am) Introductions

Part A: Introduction to Ethnography [Pachirat]

This part of the session explores the promises and pitfalls of ethnographic approaches to the political.

• 5.1.1. Clifford Geertz, "Thick Description: Toward an Interpretive Theory of Culture" in The Interpretation of Cultures (Basic Books, 1973) (assigned as U.4.1)

• 5.1.2. Bent Flyvbjerg, “The Power of Example,” in Making Social Science Matter: Why Social Inquiry Fails and How it Can Succeed Again, Steven Sampson, trans. (Cambridge University Press, 2001).

• 5.1.3. Edward Schatz, “Ethnographic Immersion and the Study of Politics” and “What Kind(s) of Ethnography does Political Science Need?” In Edward Schatz, ed., Political Ethnography: What Immersion Contributes to the Study of Power (University of Chicago Press, 2009).

• 5.1.4. Timothy Pachirat, "The Political in Political Ethnography: Dispatches from the Kill Floor." In Edward Schatz, ed., Political Ethnography: What Immersion Contributes to the Study of Power (University of Chicago Press, 2009).

Part B: Introduction to Ordinary Language Interviewing [Schaffer]

Ordinary language interviewing is a tool for uncovering the meaning of words in everyday talk. By studying the meaning of words (in English or other languages), the promise is to gain insight into the various social realities these words name, evoke, or realize. This part of the session covers some basic questions about ordinary language interviewing: what it is, what can be discovered through it, and how it is similar to and different from other types of ethnographic interviewing.

• 5.1.5. Barbara Sherman Heyl, “Ethnographic Interviewing.” In Paul Atkinson, Amanda Coffey, Sara Delamont, John Lofland and Lyn Lofland, eds., Handbook of Ethnography (Sage, 2001), pp. 369-383.

• 5.1.6. Ludwig Wittgenstein, The Blue and Brown Books (Harper, 1965), pp. 17-20.

• 5.1.7. Hanna Fenichel Pitkin, Wittgenstein and Justice: On the Significance of Ludwig Wittgenstein for Social and Political Thought (University of California Press, 1972), pp. 274-279.

• 5.1.8. Frederic Charles Schaffer, Democracy in Translation: Understanding Politics in an Unfamiliar Culture (Cornell University Press, 1998), pp. ix-xii, 54-85.

• 5.1.9. Frederic Charles Schaffer, “Thin Descriptions: The Limits of Survey Research on the Meaning of Democracy.” Polity (2014) 46,3:  

10:15am - 10:45am Coffee Break.

10:45am - 12:30pm Research Design Discussion Sessions (not part of Module).

Session 2 (1:40 - 3:30) How to Do an Ordinary Language Interview [Schaffer]

In this session participants will learn how to conduct an ordinary language interview, and practice doing one focusing on words of their own choosing. Participants will also learn and practice different strategies for approaching people to interview. By this time, participants will have selected the sites in which they will do their field exercises. Participants will work with their fieldsite groups during this session’s exercises and in the short course’s subsequent exercises.

Session 3 (3:40 - 6:00) Ordinary Language Interviewing Field Exercise and Write-Up [Schaffer]
Participants will go to fieldsites (around campus or at the Destiny USA (formerly the Carousel Center) Mall) to conduct ordinary language interviews. They will then write-up their main findings.


Thursday, June 18 Module 6, Natural Experiments I, Thad Dunning and Daniel Hidalgo

8:45am - 10:15am Introduction to Natural Experiments
Thad Dunning, University of California, Berkeley and 
Daniel Hidalgo, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

What are natural experiments? We introduce the concept of natural experiments and discuss their strengths and limitations through a survey of recent examples from political science and economics.

• 6.1.1. Thad Dunning, Natural Experiments in the Social Sciences: A Design-Based Approach (Cambridge University Press, 2012), Chapters 1-4. (Book to purchase)

• 6.1.2. Rafael Di Tella, Sebastian Galiani, and Ernesto Schargrodsky, “The Formation of Beliefs: Evidence from the Allocation of Land Titles to Squatters,” Quarterly Journal of Economics 122(1) (February 2007): 209–241.

• 6.1.3. Daniel Posner, “The Political Salience of Cultural Difference: Why Chewas and Tumbukas are Allies in Zambia and Adversaries in Malawi,” American Political Science Review 98(4) (November 2004): 529-545. 

• 6.1.4. David Clingingsmith, Asim Ijaz Khwaja, and Michael Kremer, “Estimating the Impact of the Hajj: Religion and Tolerance in Islam's Global Gathering,” Quarterly Journal of Economics 124(3) (August 2009): 1133-1170.

10:15am - 10:45am Coffee Break.

10:45am - 12:30pm Research Design Discussion Sessions (not part of Module).

12: 30pm - 2:00pm  Lunch.

2:00pm – 3:30pm   Natural Experiments: Quantitative Methods
Thad Dunning, University of California, Berkeley and 
Daniel Hidalgo, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

We discuss the role of statistical models in the analysis of natural experiments and provide an overview of quantitative techniques suitable for estimating causal effects. We emphasize the advantages of simplicity and transparency in the quantitative analysis of natural experiments.

• 6.2.1. Bjorn Tyrefors Hinnerich and Per Pettersson-Lidbom, “Democracy, Redistribution, and Political Participation: Evidence from Sweden 1919-1938.”  Econometrica 82(3) (May, 2014).

• 6.2.2. Thad Dunning, Natural Experiments in the Social Sciences: A Design-Based Approach (Cambridge University Press, 2012), Chapters 5--6. (Book to purchase)

3:30pm - 4:00pm Coffee Break.

4:00pm - 5:30pm Natural Experiments: Qualitative Methods

We highlight the essential role of qualitative methods in the analysis of natural experiments. We present examples that illustrate how qualitative evidence can bolster the credibility of causal assumptions and aid in the interpretation of quantitative results.

• 6.3.1. Thad Dunning, Natural Experiments in the Social Sciences: A Design-Based Approach (Cambridge University Press, 2012), Chapter 7. (Book to purchase)

• 6.3.2. Jeremy Ferwerda and Nicholas Miller, “Political Devolution and Resistance to Foreign Rule: A Natural Experiment,” American Political Science Review, forthcoming. 

• 6.3.3 Kocher, Matthew and Monteiro, Nuno. “What’s in a Line? Natural Experiments and the Line of Demarcation in WWII Occupied France”. 2015 Manuscript. 


Thursday, June 18 Module 7, Qualitative and Comparative Methods I, James Mahoney and Gary Goertz

Overall description: These two modules cover many classic and standard topics of qualitative methodology.  These topics include conceptualization, process tracing, comparative case-study analysis, historical analysis, and multimethod design.  The sessions will use logic and set theory as a foundation for discussing and elucidating qualitative methods. 

8:45am - 10:15am Logic and Qualitative MethodJames Mahoney, Northwestern University

This session introduces the idea that logic and set theory constitute one important set of tools used in qualitative research.

• 7.1.1 Gary Goertz and James Mahoney,  A Tale of Two Cultures: Qualitative and Quantitative Research in the Social Sciences (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2012), chaps. 1-2. (Book to purchase) 

• 7.1.2 James Mahoney and Rachel Sweet Vanderpoel, “Set Diagrams and Qualitative Research,” Comparative Political Studies 48:1 (January 2015), pp. 65-100.

10:15am - 10:45am Coffee Break.

10:45am - 12:30pm Research Design Discussion Sessions (not part of Module).

12: 30pm – 2:00pm Lunch

2:00 - 3:30) Two Cultures: Contrasting Qualitative and Quantitative Research
Gary Goertz, University of Notre Dame

This session contrasts an approach to qualitative and multimethod research based on the statistical paradigm with one based on within‐case causal analysis and logic. 

• 7.2.1 Gary Goertz and James Mahoney, A Tale of Two Cultures: Qualitative and Quantitative Research in the Social Sciences (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2012), chapters 4‐6, 9, and 15. (Book to purchase)

Recommended

• 7.2.2 Thiem, A. and Baumgartner, M. 2015. Still lost in translation: a correction of three misunderstandings between configurational comparativists and regressional analysts. Comparative Political Studies.

3:30pm - 4:00pm Coffee Break.

4:00pm - 5:30pm Mechanisms, Processes, and Sequential Analysis
James Mahoney, Northwestern University

This session provides a framework, based on logic and set theory, for the analysis of mechanisms, processes, and sequences in case study and comparative research. 

• 7.3.1 James Mahoney, Erin Kimball, and Kendra Koivu, “The Logic of Historical Explanation in the Social Sciences,” Comparative Political Studies 42:1 (January 2009), pp. 114-146.

• 7.3.2 James Mahoney, “The Logic of Process Tracing Tests in the Social Sciences,” Sociological Methods and Research, 41:4 (November 2012), 566-590.

Recommended 

• 7.3.3 Gary Goertz and James Mahoney, A Tale of Two Cultures: Qualitative and Quantitative Research in the Social Sciences (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2012), chapters 7-8. (Book to purchase)


Thursday, June 18 Module 8, Archival Research and Elite Interviewing, James Goldgeier, Andrew Moravcsik, Elizabeth Saunders

Archival and Interview Research with Primary Sources: What Do You Need to Know, How Do You Know Where to Look, and How Do You Get What You Need?

In this module, we will discuss how political scientists decide they need to use primary records of policy-making—archives, interviews, and published primary sources—in their research. This includes how one prepares for, structures, conducts, and manages the information flow from archival visits, interviews or structured examination of published materials. We focus on practical research skills scholars can use, and judgments they must make in everyday research. We conclude with a discussion of making qualitative research transparent.

8:45am - 10:15am Selecting and Preparing for Archival and Interview Research

This session highlights the practical trade-offs between different types of textual and interview research and the ways in which one must prepare for them.  It focuses on issues to think about before you start your research.  We will talk about different types of repositories, briefly explain how to use the Freedom of Information Act, and strategies for maximizing the output of interviews.

• 8.1.1. Fred I. Greenstein and Richard H. Immerman, “What Did Eisenhower Tell Kennedy About Indochina? The Politics of Misperception,” Journal of American History 79(2) (September 1992): 568-587.

• 8.1.2. Cameron Thies, “A Pragmatic Guide to Qualitative Historical Analysis in the Study of International Relations,” International Studies Perspectives 3(4) (November 2002): 351-372. 

• 8.1.3. Ian Lustick, “History, Historiography, and Political Science: Multiple Historical Records and the Problem of Selection Bias,” American Political Science Review 90(3) (September 1996): 605-618. 

• 8.1.4. Marc Trachtenberg, The Craft of International History (Princeton University Press, 2006), Appendix I and Appendix II. Available at
http://www.sscnet.ucla.edu/polisci/faculty/trachtenberg/methbk/AppendixI.html
http://www.sscnet.ucla.edu/polisci/faculty/trachtenberg/methbk/AppendixII.html


10:15am - 10:45am Coffee Break.

10:45am - 12:30pm Research Design Discussion Sessions (not part of Module).

12: 30pm - 2:00pm  Lunch.

2:00pm - 3:30pm Structuring Your Data Collection: Making Sure You Can Use What You Find

This session will address concerns that arise during your research.  We will discuss hands-on electronic strategies for structuring, organizing, and storing your oral and documentary data so that you can easily and systematically access it as you move to the analysis and writing phase of your project.  The process of structuring your data begins before you leave for the archives, and informs how you conduct your research in the archives and your analysis of documents when you get home. 

3:30pm - 4:00pm Coffee Break.

4:00pm – 5:30pm  Transparency in Qualitative Research

This session focuses on analyzing your data after you gather it, as well as making it available for other scholars to examine and utilize in the future.  In addition to discussing the uses of historical research for building theoretical arguments, we will discuss how different scholars can read documents differently, and also how documents can be used in thinking about counterfactuals.  We will also introduce participants to the emerging debate about practical research standards for transparency and replicability of qualitative work: active citations, data archiving, etc.

• 8.3.1. Andrew Moravcsik, “Active Citation: A Precondition for Replicable Qualitative Research,” PS: Political Science and Politics 43(1) (January 2010): 29-35.

• 8.3.2. Colin Elman, Diana Kapiszewski, and Lorena Vinuela, “Qualitative Data Archiving: Rewards and Challenges,” PS: Political Science and Politics 43(1) (January 2010): 23-27.
 

Thursday, June 18 Module 9. Ethnographic Methods II, Frederic Schaffer and Timothy Pachirat

Session 1 (8:45 -10:15) Ordinary Language Interview Debriefing [Schaffer]

First we will discuss the challenges participants encountered in approaching people to interview, conducting ordinary language interviews, and writing up results. Next we will catalogue the different word uses/meanings that participants discovered in doing their fieldsite interviews.

10:15am - 10:45am Coffee Break.

10:45am - 12:30pm Research Design Discussion Sessions (not part of Module).

12: 30pm - 2:00pm  Lunch.

Session 2 (2:00 - 3:30) Ethics and Praxis in Participant Observation [Pachirat]

An exploration of the practice of participant observation, with special emphasis on jottings, fieldnote writing, and the ethics of fieldwork.

• 9.2.1. Robert M. Emerson, Rachel I. Fretz, and Linda L. Shaw, Writing Ethnographic Fieldnotes (University of Chicago Press, 1995), Chapters 1-5. (Book to purchase)

Session 3 (3:40 - 5:30) Participant Observation Fieldwork Exercise [Pachirat]

In their fieldsite groups, participants will conduct participant-observation exercises in pre-selected sites.

Session 4 (5:30 - 7:30) Fieldnote Writing

Participants will use this time to write up a set of fieldnotes based on jottings taken in their
fieldsites.


Friday, June 19 Module 10, Natural Experiments II, Thad Dunning and Daniel Hidalgo

8:30am - 10:00am Evaluating Natural Experiments
Thad Dunning, University of California, Berkeley and 
Daniel Hidalgo, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

We critically assess natural-experimental research using an evaluative framework based on (1) the plausibility of as-if random assignment; (2) the credibility of causal and statistical assumptions; and (3) the substantive and theoretical relevance of the intervention.  We emphasize the importance of quantitative and qualitative diagnostics and substantive knowledge for building successful natural-experimental designs.

• 10.1.1. Thad Dunning, Natural Experiments in the Social Sciences: A Design-Based Approach (Cambridge University Press 2012), Chapters 8-10. (Book to purchase)

• 10.1.2. Devin Caughey and Jasjeet Sekhon, “Elections and the Regression Discontinuity Design: Lessons from Close U.S. House Races, 1942–2008,” Political Analysis 19(4) (October 2011): 385-408.

10:00am - 10:30am Coffee Break.

10:45am - 12:30pm Research Design Discussion Sessions (not part of Module).

12: 30pm - 2:00pm  Lunch.

2:00pm - 3:30pm Design Your Own Natural Experiment
Thad Dunning, University of California, Berkeley and 
Daniel Hidalgo, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

In this session, we give participants the opportunity to design a natural experiment related to their own work and receive feedback from course participants.

3:30pm - 4:00pm Coffee Break.

4:00pm - 5:30pm Multi-Method Research and Natural Experiments
Thad Dunning, University of California, Berkeley and 
Daniel Hidalgo, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

We end the course by evaluating the promise and obstacles to the use of multi-method research in the analysis of natural experiments. Drawing upon the previous sessions and readings, we discuss how qualitative methods can help address some of the criticisms of natural experiments, as well as how natural experiments can bolster the inferences drawn from qualitative evidence. 

• 10.3.1. Thad Dunning, Natural Experiments in the Social Sciences: A Design-Based Approach (Cambridge University Press 2012), Chapter 11.  (Book to purchase)


Further Readings by Topic (for both Modules 6 and 10):

Standard Natural Experiments:

Christopher Blattman, “From Violence to Voting: War and Political Participation in Uganda” American Political Science Review 103(2) (May 2009): 231-247.

Raghabendra Chattopadhyay and Esther Duflo, “Women as Policy Makers: Evidence from a Randomized Experiment in India,” Econometrica 72(5) (September 2004): 1409-1443.

Daniel Doherty, Donald Green, and Alan Gerber, “Personal Income and Attitudes toward Redistribution: A Study of Lottery Winners,” Political Psychology 27(3) (June 2006): 441-458.

Claudio Ferraz and Frederico Finan, “Exposing Corrupt Politicians: The Effect of Brazil’s Publicly Released Audits on Electoral Outcomes,” Quarterly Journal of Economics 123(2) (May 2008): 703-745.

Susan Hyde, “The Observer Effect in International Politics: Evidence from a Natural Experiment,” World Politics 60(1) (October 2007): 37–63. 

Jason Lyall, “Does Indiscriminate Violence Incite Insurgent Attacks? Evidence from Chechnya,” Journal of Conflict Resolution 53(3) (June 2009): 331-362.

Daniel N. Posner, “The Political Salience of Cultural Difference: Why Chewas and Tumbukas Are Allies in Zambia and Adversaries in Malawi,” American Political Science Review 98(4) (November 2004): 529-545.

Regression-Discontinuity Designs:

Thad Dunning and Janhavi Nilekani, “Ethnic Quotas and Political Mobilization: Caste, Parties, and Distribution in Indian Village Councils.” Working paper, Department of Political Science, Yale University (2010).  Available at http://www.thaddunning.com/research/all-research.

David S. Lee, “Randomized Experiments from Non-random Selection in U.S. House Elections,” Journal of Econometrics 142(2) (February 2008): 675-697.

Amy Lerman, “Bowling Alone (With my Own Ball and Chain): The Effects of Incarceration and the Dark Side of Social Capital.”  Manuscript, Department of Politics, Princeton University (2008).

Donald L. Thistlewaite and Donald T. Campbell, “Regression-discontinuity Analysis: An Alternative to the Ex-post Facto Experiment,” Journal of Educational Psychology 51(6) (December 1960): 309-317.

Instrumental-Variables Designs:

Edward Miguel, Shanker Satyanath, and Ernest Sergenti, “Economic Shocks and Civil Conflict: An Instrumental Variables Approach,” Journal of Political Economy 112(4) (August 2004): 725-753.

Analysis and Design:

Joshua D. Angrist and Alan B. Krueger, “Instrumental Variables and the Search for Identification: From Supply and Demand to Natural Experiments,” Journal of Economic Perspectives 15(4) (Fall 2001): 69-85. 

Henry Brady and David Collier, eds., Rethinking Social Inquiry: Diverse Tools, Shared Standards, 2nd ed. (Rowman & Littlefield, 2010).

Donald T. Campbell and Julian C. Stanley, Experimental and Quasi-Experimental Designs for Research (Houghton Mifflin Co., 1963).

Thad Dunning, “Improving Causal Inference: Strengths and Limitations of Natural Experiments,” Political Research Quarterly 61(2) (June 2008): 282-293.

Thad Dunning, “Model Specification in Instrumental-Variables Regression,” Political Analysis 16(3) (July 2008): 290-302.

Thad Dunning, “Natural and Field Experiments: The Role of Qualitative Methods,” Qualitative Methods Newsletter 6(2) (2008).

David Freedman, Statistical Models: Theory and Practice (Cambridge University Press, 2005).

David Freedman, Robert Pisani, and Roger Purves, Statistics, 4th ed. (W.W. Norton & Co., 2007), Chapter 1 (“Controlled Experiments”) and Chapter 2 (“Observational Studies”).

Donald P. Green, Terence Y. Leong, Holger L. Kern, Alan S. Gerber, and Christopher W. Larimer,   “Testing the Accuracy of Regression Discontinuity Analysis Using Experimental Benchmarks,”  Political Analysis 17(4) (October 2009): 400-417.

Allison J. Sovey and Donald P. Green, “Instrumental Variables Estimation in Political Science: A Readers’ Guide,” American Journal of Political Science 55(1) (January 2011): 188-200.

Qualitative Methods

Kripa Ananthpur, Kabir Malik, and Vijayendra Rao, “The Anatomy of Failure: An Ethnography of a Randomized Trial to Deepen Democracy in Rural India.” June 2014

Christopher Blattman, Tricia Gonwa, Julian Jamison, Katherine Rodrigues, and Margaret Sheridan. “Measuring the Measurement Error: A Method to Qualitatively Validate Survey Data”. November 2014. 

Elizabeth Levy Plaluck. “The Promising Integration of Qualitative Methods and Field Experiments”. Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences”. 628 March 2010.  


Friday, June 19 Module 11, Qualitative and Comparative Methods II, James Mahoney and Gary Goertz

8:45am -10:15am Social Science Concepts 
Gary Goertz, University of Notre Dame

This session provides basic guidelines for the construction and evaluation of concepts.  In particular, it provides a framework for dealing with complex concepts, which are typical in much social science research. 

• 11.1.1 Gary Goertz, Social Science Concepts, chapters 1-2. 

• 11.1.2 Gary Goertz and James Mahoney, A Tale of Two Cultures: Qualitative and Quantitative Research in the Social Sciences (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2012), chaps. 11-13. (Book to purchase)

10:15am - 10:45am Coffee Break.

10:45am - 12:30pm Research Design Discussion Sessions (not part of Module).

12: 30pm - 2:00pm  Lunch.

2:00 - 3:30 Comparative-Historical Analysis 
James Mahoney, Northwestern University

This session provides an introduction to comparative-historical analysis in contemporary social science.  It explores three orientations associated with this approach:  macro-configurational explanation; case-based research; and temporally-oriented analysis.  

• 11.2.1 Kathleen Thelen and James Mahoney, “Comparative-Historical Analysis in Contemporary Political Science,” in James Mahoney and Kathleen Thelen, eds., Advances in Comparative-Historical Analysis. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2015.

• 11.2.2 Tulia Falleti and James Mahoney, “The Comparative Sequential Method,” in James Mahoney and Kathleen Thelen, eds., Advances in Comparative-Historical Analysis. New York: Cambridge University Press, forthcoming.

Recommended:

• 11.2.3 James Mahoney and Dietrich Rueschemeyer, eds., Comparative Historical Analysis in the Social Sciences (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2003).

3:30pm - 4:00pm Coffee Break.

4:00pm - 5:30pm Case Selection and Multimethod Research Designs 
Gary Goertz, University of Notre Dame

This session offers practical considerations for selecting specific cases for intensive analysis. The session develops guidelines and rules for choosing cases that will allow qualitative researchers to achieve maximum leverage for causal inference, both in comparative case study as well as multimethod designs. 

• 11.3.1  Gary Goertz, “Statistical Multimethod and Case Selection” and “Case Studies, Causal Mechanisms, and Selecting Cases,” chapters 1-2, and Appendix A, Manuscript 2015.

Recommended: 

• 11.3.2 Gary Goertz and James Mahoney, A Tale of Two Cultures: Qualitative and Quantitative Research in the Social Sciences (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2012), chap. 14. (Book to purchase)


Friday, June 19 Module 12 Managing and Sharing Qualitative Data and Making Qualitative Research Transparent
Louise Corti and Diana Kapiszewski

In this module, we demonstrate that effective data management throughout the research lifecycle is a key pre-requisite for successful data sharing.  We discuss strategies for managing and sharing data and emphasize the importance of learning to do so, given that funding agencies, publishers, and academic associations alike are increasingly requiring that scholars share their research data.  We also highlight the benefits of sharing data, including enhanced citation and collaboration, and catalyzing and accelerating secondary analysis.  We consider some perceived barriers to data sharing and demonstrate, with practical tasks, appropriate techniques for overcoming them. Finally, we discuss how making qualitative research more transparent (i.e., clearly conveying how data were generated and analyzed to produce inferences and interpretations) helps scholars to showcase the rigor of their work, and we introduce strategies for achieving research transparency in qualitative inquiry.  

Participants will benefit most from the module and its practical exercises if they have an actual research project, including its data-generation issues and challenges, in mind.  For those who are neither soon beginning nor in the midst of an ongoing project, we will provide an example. For the third session, participants will be working directly with one of their own research products (i.e., a paper, published article, etc.).   

8:45am - 10:15am  Managing Data 
Louise Corti, UK Data Archive at the University of Essex 
Diana Kapiszewski, Georgetown University

We introduce the notion of the ‘data lifecycle’ to demonstrate that research data can prove useful far beyond the research project that created them. We use examples of real research projects to establish which protocols might be needed at key stages of the research cycle, and to identify trigger points at which data sharing considerations come into play.  We consider the role of data in planning and designing research projects and examine the strategies and techniques required to give data a longer life.  Finally, we discuss briefly the role of describing and contextualizing data in order for them to be reusable, and consider the issues that need to be addressed in order to manage data safely.  Exercises and lightweight quizzes are used to help consolidate this knowledge. Students will also receive guidance on developing, and will have the opportunity to begin to develop, a Data Management Plan (DMP).

• 12.1.1. Corti, L., Van den Eynden, V., Bishop, L. and Woollard, M. (2014) Managing and Sharing Research Data: A Guide to Good Practice, London: Sage. Chapters 2, 3 and 4. (Book to purchase)

• 12.1.2. MIT Libraries (2013) ‘Writing an NSF Data Management Plan’ (http://libraries.mit.edu/guides/subjects/data-management/nsf-dm-plan.pdf)
• 12.1.3. ICPSR (2014) ‘Framework for Creating a Data Management Plan’, University of Michigan (http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/content/datamanagement/dmp/framework.html)

Recommended

• 12.1.4.  Corti, L. and Thompson, P. (2012) 'Secondary analysis of archived data' in J. Goodwin (ed.) SAGE: Secondary Data Analysis London: Sage Publications Ltd (http://repository.essex.ac.uk/2444/) 

10:15am - 10:45am Coffee Break.

10:45am - 12:30pm Research Design Discussion Sessions (not part of Module).

12: 30pm - 2:00pm  Lunch.                      

2:00pm - 3:30pm  Sharing Qualitative Data
Louise Corti, UK Data Archive at the University of Essex 
Diana Kapiszewski, Georgetown University

We discuss the benefits that accrue from sharing qualitative data; the ethical, legal, and logistical challenges that complicate doing so; and best practices for addressing the latter.  With regard to human subjects concerns, we consider adaptations to the process of soliciting informed consent to enable data sharing at the end of a project; discuss appropriate strategies for anonymizing qualitative data aiming to preserve original content while minimizing disclosure risk where confidentiality has been promised; and examine how to select appropriate access controls for shared data.  We briefly cover issues of rights management – who owns ‘your’ data? – and debate copyright concerns and how they can be addressed; we also consider the notion of “fair use.”  We describe suitable venues for sharing data and highlight the advantages of doing so in an institutional venue, including long-term availability of data and professional curation of research assets; we also introduce the Qualitative Data Repository (www.qdr.org).  Students are encouraged to consider questions of ethics and rights in relation to the DMP they began to develop in the first session.

• 12.2.1. Corti, L., Van den Eynden, V., Bishop, L. and Woollard, M. (2014) Managing and Sharing Research Data: A Guide to Good Practice, London: Sage. Chapters 7 and 8. (Book to purchase)

• 12.2.2.  Bishop, L. (2009) 'Ethical Sharing and Re-Use of Qualitative Data', Australian Journal of Social Issues, 44(3). (http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/media/249157/ajsi44bishop.pdf)
• 12.2.3. Singer, E., Levine, F. (2003) ‘Protection of Human Subjects of Research: Recent Developments and Future Prospects for the Social Sciences.’ Public Opinion Quarterly, 67(1): 148-164.

• 12.2.4. University of Minnesota Libraries (2015) 'Copyright Information and Resources' (https://www.lib.umn.edu/copyright/fairuse)

Recommended

• 12.2.5. Clark, A. (2006) ‘Anonymising Research Data’, ESRC National Centre for Research Methods, Working Paper 7/06. 
(http://eprints.ncrm.ac.uk/480/1/0706_anonymising_research_data.pdf)

• 12.2.6. Yardley, S. et al. (2013) ‘Ethical Issues in the Reuse of Qualitative Data: Perspectives From Literature, Practice, and Participants’, Qualitative Health Research, 2014, Vol. 24(1) 102–113. (http://qhr.sagepub.com/content/24/1/102.full.pdf+html)

• 12.2.7. Bailey, C., Baxter, J, Mort, M. and Convery, I. ‘Community Experiences of the 2001 Foot and Mouth Disease Epidemic in North Cumbria: An Archiving Story’ Methodological Innovations Online,  (2006) 1(2) 83-94 
(http://www.esds.ac.uk/news/publications/MIOBailey-pp83-94.pdf)

3:30pm - 4:00pm Coffee Break.

4:00pm - 5:30pm  Making Qualitative Research Transparent
Louise Corti, UK Data Archive at the University of Essex 
Diana Kapiszewski, Georgetown University

We introduce a definition of, some benefits of, and strategies for achieving research transparency in qualitative inquiry.  Research transparency comprises production transparency (clearly describing the processes through which data were generated) and analytic transparency (clearly indicating how data were analyzed and how they support claims, conclusions, inferences and interpretations in scholarship).  We discuss how research transparency reveals the rigor of qualitative inquiry, consider strategies for achieving research transparency, and consider whether qualitative work can be “replicated” in the sense that quantitative scholars use the term.  We illustrate, and consider the merits and limitations of, one transparency technique for qualitative research, active citation, using pilot data projects deposited with the Qualitative Data Repository.  Participants are called on to think through what increasing the transparency of a piece of their own scholarship would entail.  

• 12.3.1. Lupia, Arthur and Colin Elman.  2014.  “Openness in Political Science: Data Access and Research Transparency – Introduction.” PS: Political Science & Politics 47(01):  19-42.

• 12.3.2. Elman, Colin and Diana Kapiszewski. 2014.  “Data Access and Research Transparency in the Qualitative Tradition.”  PS: Political Science & Politics 47(01):  43-47.

• 12.3.3. Moravcsik, Andrew.  2014.  “Transparency: The Revolution in Qualitative Research.” PS: Political Science & Politics 47(01):  48-53.

Recommended

• 12.3.4. Moravcsik, Andrew, Colin Elman, and Diana Kapiszewski.  2013.  “A Guide to Active Citation” Qualitative Data Repository. 

• 12.3.5. Ishiyama, John.  2014.  “Replication, Research Transparency, and Journal Publications: Individualism, Community Models, and the Future of Replication Studies.”  PS: Political Science & Politics 47(01):  78-83.

• 12.3.6. The (DA-RT) Data Access and Research Transparency Joint Statement (http://www.dartstatement.org)


Friday, June 19 Module 13, Ethnographic Methods III, Frederic Schaffer and Timothy Pachirat

Session 1 (9:15 - 10:15) Fieldsite Group Reviews of Fieldnotes 

Participants exchange and comment on each other’s fieldnotes.

10:15am - 10:45am Coffee Break.

10:45am - 12:30pm Research Design Discussion Sessions (not part of Module).

12: 30pm - 2:00pm  Lunch.                      

Session 2 (2:00 - 3:30) Fieldsite Group Discussions and Presentations

Participants combine with other fieldsite groups to discuss the experience of doing participant observation.

3:30pm - 4:00pm Coffee Break.

Session 3 (4:00 - 5:30) Overall Debriefing (ordinary language interviewing and participant observation) [Pachirat and Schaffer]

In this session, we will reflect together on the following three clusters of questions: (1) How can ordinary language interviewing and participant observation be fruitfully combined when doing ethnographic fieldwork? What are the potential pitfalls of such a combination? (2) To what extent does the method one adopts shape what one apprehends? Specifically, do we learn something different when we access meaning by means of (relatively unstructured) participant observation as opposed to (relatively structured) ordinary language interviewing? (3) Is there anything that you learned about ordinary language interview and/or participant observation that might or will inform your *own* research?


Monday, June 22 Module 14, Computer-Assisted Content Analysis I, Will Lowe and Sven Oliver Proksch

This module presumes basic mathematical and statistical concepts and will involve work with computers. The computational elements will include using point-and-click software and dedicated R packages.  Prior expertise with these is not required, just a willingness to explore new tools.  The instructors will provide as much support as necessary to ensure that students can effectively participate in the course and apply these tools in their own projects.  Participants choosing this module should bring a laptop and be prepared to install software beforehand (A handout with the software prerequisites will be provided before the course). Participants with problems following the installation instructions will be able to meet with the instructors on Sunday, June 21, at 8pm in the lobby of the Sheraton hotel.

8:45am - 10:15am Computer-assisted coding of document topics
Will Lowe (University of Mannheim) and Sven-Oliver Proksch (McGill University)

In the first session we investigate dictionary-based content analysis in old and new style.  We will focus on identifying the assumptions of these widely used measurement models, learning how to use their results effectively in subsequent analyses, validating them, and maybe even correcting them. Finally, we’ll consider the mechanics of getting other people to do the content analysis for us.

• 14.1.1. M. Laver, J. Garry, Estimating policy positions from political texts. American Journal of Political Science, 44(3) (2000):619–634.

• 14.1.2. K. Benoit, D. Conway, M. Laver, and S. Mikhaylov, Crowd-sourced data coding for the social sciences: massive non-expert coding of political texts, Working Paper (2012).

Recommended
• 14.1.3. J. Bara, A. Weale, and A. Biquelet, Analysing parliamentary debate with computer assistance. Swiss Political Science Review, 13(4) (2007):577-605.

• 14.1.4. K. Krippendorf, Content Analysis: An Introduction to Its Methodology. Sage, 1980.

10:15am - 10:45am Coffee Break.

10:45am - 12:30pm Research Design Discussion Sessions (not part of Module).

12:30pm - 2:00pm  Lunch.

2:00pm - 3:30pm Practical I
Will Lowe (University of Mannheim) and Sven-Oliver Proksch (McGill University)

We present open source text analysis tools for dictionary-based content analysis and replicate several studies using various text sources e.g. parliamentary speeches, media reports. Participants should bring a laptop on which they have pre-installed software (see instruction sheet).

3:30pm - 4:00pm Coffee Break.

4:00pm - 5:30pm Computer-assisted assignment of categories to documents
Will Lowe (University of Mannheim) and Sven-Oliver Proksch (McGill University)

Classification methods automate the assignment of texts to categories in a content typology without the need to construct a dictionary.  This session considers applications of both approaches and considers their advantages and limitations for social scientific research.

• 14.3.1. J. Grimmer and B. Stewart, Text as Data: The Promise and Pitfalls of Automatic Content Analysis Methods for Political Texts, Political Analysis (2013)

Recommended
• 14.3.2. W. McIntosh, M. Evans, J. Lin, and C. Cates, Recounting the courts? applying automated content analysis to enhance empirical legal research. Journal of Empirical Legal Studies, 4(4) (2007):1041– 1057.

• 14.3.3.  D. Hillard, S. J.  Purpura, and S. Wilkerson, Computer assisted topic classification for mixed methods social science research. Journal of Information Technology and Politics, 4(4) (2008):31-46


Monday, June 22 Module 15 – QCA/fs I, Charles Ragin and Carsten Schneider

This module presents the basic principles and practices of set-analytic methods, in general, and Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA), in particular. After introducing the tools of formal logic and set theory that underpin this family of methods, participants learn about the formalized analysis of set relations using truth tables. Particular attention is given to (a) the assessment of set-theoretic consistency and coverage, and (b) the phenomenon of limited diversity and how QCA enables researcher to employ counterfactual reasoning.

8:45am - 10:15am Introduction to Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA)
Charles Ragin, University of California, Irvine

This session introduces QCA, especially its use as a tool for deciphering and unraveling causal complexity. QCA uses set-analytic procedures that are consistent with common practices in case-oriented comparative research. The key difference is that with QCA it is possible to examine an intermediate number of cases—too many for conventional case-oriented analysis. 

• 15.1.1. Charles C. Ragin, Redesigning Social Inquiry: Fuzzy Sets and Beyond. University of Chicago Press, 2008, chapters 1-3. (book to purchase)

• 15.1.2. Carsten Q. Schneider and Claudius Wagemann, Set‐Theoretic Methods for the Social Sciences: A Guide to Qualitative Comparative Analysis (Cambridge University Press, 2012), Chapter 2, pp. 42‐55. (book to purchase)

Recommended:

• 15.1.3. Gary Goertz and James Mahoney, “Mathematical Prelude: A Selective Introduction to Logic and Set Theory for Social Scientists” in A Tale of Two Cultures: Qualitative and Quantitative Research in the Social Sciences (Princeton University Press, 2012), pp. 16‐38.

• 15.1.4. Axel Marx, Benoit Rihoux and Charles Ragin, “The origins, development, and application of Qualitative Comparative Analysis: the first 25 years.” European Political Science Review, 2013.

10:15am - 10:45am Coffee Break.

10:45am - 12:30pm Research Design Discussion Sessions (not part of Module).

12: 30pm - 2:00pm  Lunch.                      

2:00pm - 3:30pm Constructing and Analyzing Truth Tables
Charles Ragin, University of California, Irvine and Carsten Schneider, Central European University, Budapest

This session describes the procedures for constructing and analyzing truth tables. Truth tables are at the heart of any QCA. We first explain how not only crisp, but also fuzzy sets can be represented in a truth table. Then we explain the logic of identifying sufficient terms for the outcome, using logical minimization.

• 15.2.1. Charles C. Ragin, “Boolean approach to qualitative comparison.” The Comparative Method: Moving Beyond Qualitative and Quantitative Strategies. University of California Press, 1987, Chapter 6

• 15.2.2 Carsten Q. Schneider and Claudius Wagemann, Set‐Theoretic Methods for the Social Sciences: A Guide to Qualitative Comparative Analysis (Cambridge University Press, 2012), Chapter 4, pp. 92‐116 (book to purchase)

Recommended:

• 15.2.3. Ragin, Charles and Lisa Amoroso. Constructing Social Research, Second Edition (Pine Forge Press, 2011), Chapter 6, pp. 135-161.

• 15.2.4. Rihoux, Benoit and Charles Ragin. Configurational Comparative Methods (Sage, 2009), Chapter 3, pp. 33-68.

3:30pm - 4:00pm Coffee Break.

4:00pm - 5:30pm   Counterfactual Analysis: A Set-Analytic Approach
Charles Ragin, University of California, Irvine and Carsten Schneider, Central European University, Budapest

This session further elaborates truth table analysis. One of the key features of qualitative research is its reliance on counterfactual analysis. Surprisingly, most qualitative researchers are unaware that they conduct counterfactual analysis “on the fly,” and the analytic process remains hidden and implicit. With QCA, counterfactual analysis is made explicit in the form of the distinction between “easy” versus “difficult” versus “untenable” counterfactual claims. The examination of counterfactual analysis in QCA illustrates the theory and knowledge dependence of empirical social science.

• 15.3.1. Charles C. Ragin, Redesigning Social Inquiry: Fuzzy Sets and Beyond. University of Chicago Press, 2008, chapters 8-9. (book to purchase)

• 15.3.2. Carsten Q. Schneider and Claudius Wagemann, Set‐Theoretic Methods for the Social Sciences: A Guide to Qualitative Comparative Analysis (Cambridge University Press, 2012), Chapters 7 and 8, pp. 178‐217. (book to purchase)

Recommended:

• 15.3.3. Charles C. Ragin, Extensions of Boolean methods of qualitative comparison. The Comparative Method: Moving Beyond Qualitative and Quantitative Strategies. University of California Press, 1987, Chapter 7, pp. 103-124.


Monday, June 22 Module 16, Designing and Conducting Fieldwork: Preparing and Operating in the Field – Diana Kapiszewski and Lauren MacLean

This module considers the contours and content of field research and why fieldwork entails iterating among research design, data collection, and data analysis.  We discuss how to prepare for field research and offers strategies for addressing the various intellectual, logistical, and social challenges that carrying out field research involves. Each session is conducted with the understanding that participants have carefully read the assigned materials.  The instructors will present key points drawing on the readings and their collective experiences in managing fieldwork’s diverse challenges, and will then facilitate discussion of concepts and ideas in small and large groups.  Students will also have an opportunity to practice using the data-collection techniques discussed and research tools presented. 

8:45am - 10:15am  Borders and Varieties of Fieldwork 
Diana Kapiszewski, Georgetown University 
Lauren M. MacLean, Indiana University

In this session we discuss our conception of field research as an iterative process entailing repeated shifts among research design, data collection, and data analysis, and consider some of the implications of this conception. We discuss fieldwork’s heterogeneity and the various ways in which it varies across projects, and also address issues of ethics and power in the field. 

• 16.1.1. Diana Kapiszewski, Lauren M. MacLean, and Benjamin L. Read, “Field Research in Political Science:  Practices and Principles,” Chapter One in Field Research in Political Science: Practices and Principles (Cambridge University Press, 2015). (Book to purchase)

• 16.1.2. Elisabeth Wood, “The Ethical Challenges of Field Research in Conflict Zones,” Qualitative Sociology 29(3) (September 2006):  373-386.

Recommended

• 16.1.3. David Collier, “Data, Field Work and Extracting New Ideas at Close Range,” APSA-CP Newsletter 10(1) (Winter 1999): 1-2, 4-6.  

• 16.1.4. Elisabeth Wood, “Field Methods.”  In Charles Boix and Susan Stokes, eds., The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Politics (Oxford University Press, 2007).

• 16.1.5. David Collier, David A. Freedman, James D. Fearon, David D. Laitin, John Gerring, and Gary Goertz, “Symposium: Case Selection, Case Studies, and Causal Inference,” Qualitative & Multi-Method Research 6(2) (Fall 2008):  2-16.

• 16.1.6. Soledad Loaeza, Randy Stevenson, and Devra C. Moehler, “Symposium:  Should Everyone Do Fieldwork?,” APSA-CP Newsletter 16(2) (2005):  8-18. 

• 16.1.7. Diana Kapiszewski, Lauren M. MacLean, and Benjamin L. Read, “A Historical and Empirical Overview of Field Research in the Discipline,” Chapter Two in Field Research in Political Science: Practices and Principles (Cambridge University Press, 2015). (Book to purchase)

10:15am - 10:45am Coffee Break.

10:45am - 12:30pm Research Design Discussion Sessions (not part of Module).

12: 30pm - 2:00pm  Lunch.

2:00pm - 3:30pm Preparing for Fieldwork 
Diana Kapiszewski, Georgetown University 
Lauren M. MacLean, Indiana University

This session addresses pre-dissertation and other exploratory research, logistical preparations for fieldwork, securing funding, networking to obtain contacts and interviews, negotiating institutional affiliation, and developing a data-collection plan. 

• 16.2.1. Diana Kapiszewski, Lauren M. MacLean, and Benjamin L. Read, “Preparing for Fieldwork,” Chapter Three in Field Research in Political Science: Practices and Principles (Cambridge University Press, 2015).  (Book to purchase)

• 16.2.2. Christopher B. Barrett and Jeffrey W. Cason, “Identifying a Site and Funding Source” in Overseas Research II: A Practical Guide (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2010).

Recommended

• 16.2.3. Christopher B. Barrett and Jeffrey W. Cason, “Predeparture Preparations” in Overseas Research II: A Practical Guide (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2010).  
  
3:30pm - 4:00pm Coffee Break.

4:00pm - 5:30pm Operating in the Field
Diana Kapiszewski, Georgetown University
Lauren M. MacLean, Indiana University

This session offers practical advice on collecting data and managing inter-personal relations in the field.  We introduce a range of more-interactive and less-interactive data-collection techniques, with a particular emphasis on the latter, and consider the trade-offs among them and how they can be combined.  We discuss hiring and working with research assistants and broader issues of cooperation and managing relationships in the field.   

• 16.3.1. Diana Kapiszewski, Lauren M. MacLean, and Benjamin L. Read, “Managing in the Field: Logistical, Social, Operational, and Ethical Challenges,” Chapter Four in Field Research in Political Science: Practices and Principles (Cambridge University Press, 2015). (Book to purchase)

• 16.3.2. Lee Ann Fuji, “Working with Interpreters.”  In Layna Mosley, ed., Interview Research in Political Science (Cornell University Press, 2013). (Book to purchase)

Recommended

• 16.3.3. Melani Cammett, “Positionality and Sensitive Topics:  Matched Proxy Interviewing as a Research Strategy.”  In Layna Mosley, ed., Interview Research in Political Science (Cornell University Press, 2013).  (Book to purchase)

• 16.3.4. Sheila Carapico, Janine A. Clark, Amaney Jamal, David Romano, Jilian Schwedler, and Mark Tessler, “Symposium: The Methodologies of Field Research in the Middle East,”  PS:  Political Science and Politics 39(3) (July 2006).


Tuesday, June 23 Module 17, Computer-Assisted Content Analysis II, Will Lowe and Sven Oliver Proksch

8:45am - 10:15am Practical II 
Will Lowe (University of Mannheim) and Sven-Oliver Proksch (McGill University)

In this exercise session, we show how to use open source text analysis tools for supervised automated classification. The lab will take the form of a worked example using R and its various text analysis packages. 

10:15am - 10:45am Coffee Break.

10:45am - 12:30pm Research Design Discussion Sessions (not part of Module).

12: 30pm - 2:00pm  Lunch.

2:00pm - 3:30pm Computer-assisted inference about document positions
Will Lowe (University of Mannheim) and Sven-Oliver Proksch (McGill University)

Scaling models try to estimate actors' positions on interesting dimensions using differential word usage. In this session we learn how to fit and interpret such models, how to think about dimensionality of texts, what important discourse features are left out or abstracted away, and what we have to assume about how words are generated in order to be able to apply them. We then consider to what extent those assumptions are reasonable, and also how square them with the idiosyncratic and often strategically structured institutional contexts in which political language actually appears.

• 17.2.1. M. Laver, K. Benoit, and J. Garry,  Extracting Policy Positions from Political Texts Using Words as Data. American Political Science Review 97(2) 2003: 311-332. 

• 17.2.2. S.-O. Proksch and J.B. Slapin, Position taking in European Parliament speeches.  British Journal of Political Science, 2009.

Recommended

• 17.2.3. W. Lowe, K. Benoit, S. Mikhaylov, and M. Laver, Scaling policy positions from coded units of political texts. Legislative Studies Quarterly 36(1) 2011:123-155

• 17.2.4. J. Slapin and S-O Proksch, A Scaling Model for Estimating Time-Series Party Positions from Texts. American Journal of Political Science 52(3) 2008: 705-722. 

• 17.2.5 S-O Proksch and J. Slapin, Institutional Foundations of Legislative Speech. American Journal of Political Science 56(3) 2012: 520-537

3:30pm - 4:00pm Coffee Break.

4:00pm – 5:30pm Content Analysis and Research Design
Will Lowe (University of Mannheim) and Sven-Oliver Proksch (McGill University)

In this session we discuss the strengths and limitations of the methods shown in the previous sessions with an eye to how computer assisted content analyses can be best integrated into your research designs. We also welcome practical questions concerning data acquisition, computing issues, and effective presentation of text analysis results. 
This session is organized in a question and answer format: You ask the questions, and we (as a group) will try to provide some useful answers.


Tuesday, June 23, Module 18 – QCA/fs II, Charles Ragin and Carsten Schneider

This module discusses various advanced issues in using set-analytic methods: (a) calibrating set membership, (b) constructing macro-conditions, and (c) set-analytic multi-method research. In the final session we review several applications of set-analytic methods.

8:45am - 10:15am Calibrating Set Membership
Charles Ragin, University of California, Irvine 

Almost all cross-case information can be represented in terms of fuzzy sets. Unlike “variables,” fuzzy sets must be calibrated, and the calibration of fuzzy sets relies heavily on external knowledge, not on inductively derived statistics like means and standard deviations. This use of external knowledge provides the basis for a much tighter coupling of theoretical concepts and empirical analysis.

• 18.1.1. Charles C. Ragin, Redesigning Social Inquiry: Fuzzy Sets and Beyond. University of Chicago Press, 2008, chapters 4, 5. (book to purchase)

Recommended:

• 18.1.2. Charles C. Ragin, Fuzzy-Set Social Science, University of Chicago Press, 2000, chapter 6, pp. 149-180.

• 18.1.3. Basurto, Xavier, and Johanna Speer. 2012. “Structuring the Calibration of Qualitative Data as Sets for Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA).” Field Methods 24(2): 155-74.

10:15am - 10:45am Coffee Break.

10:45am - 12:30pm Research Design Discussion Sessions (not part of Module).

12: 30pm - 2:00pm Lunch.

2:00pm - 3:30pm Set-Analytic Multi-Method Research
Carsten Schneider, Central European University, Budapest

This session explains the principles and some (computer-aided) practices of combining the truth table analysis aspect of QCA with follow-up within-case analyses of purposefully selected cases. We discuss which cases, based on a cross-case pattern discerned with QCA, are typical and which ones are deviant. We also spell out which of the potentially many typical and deviant cases should be chosen for either single-case or comparative within-case analysis and what the analytic goal of process tracing can (and cannot) be. 

• 18.2.1. Carsten Q. Schneider and Ingo Rohlfing, “Combining QCA and Process Tracing in Set-Theoretic Multi-Method Research.” Sociological Methods and Research (2013) 42(4): 559–97.

• 18.2.2. Ingo Rohlfing and Carsten Q. Schneider, “Improving Research on Necessary Conditions: Formalized Case Selection for Process Tracing after QCA.” Political Research Quarterly (2013) 66(1): 220–35.

Recommended:

 18.2.3. Ragin, Charles C., and Garrett Andrew Schneider. 2011. “Case-Oriented Theory Building and Theory Testing.” In The SAGE Handbook of Innovations in Social Research Methods, ed. Malcolm; Vogt Williams W. Paul. London, 150–66.

 18.2.4. Rihoux, Benoit, and Bojana Lobe. 2009. “The Case for Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA): Adding Leverage for Thick Cross-Case Comparison.” In Sage Handbook Of Case-Based Methods, eds. David Byrne and Charles Ragin. London: Sage, 222–42.

3:30pm - 4:00pm Coffee Break.

4:00pm - 5:30pm

This session reviews several applications of set-analytic methods. Our goal is to illustrate the utility and flexibility of the approach, as well as its tight coupling with theoretical concepts. We include a large-N application to illustrate issues in applying QCA to such data.

• 18.3.1. Charles C. Ragin, Redesigning Social Inquiry: Fuzzy Sets and Beyond. University of Chicago Press, 2008, chapters 10, 11. (book to purchase)

• 18.3.2. Charles Ragin and Peer Fiss, Intersectional Inequality: Race, Class, Test Scores and Poverty. book manuscript, chapters 6 and 7.

• 18.3.3. Carsten Q. Schneider and Kristin Makszin, “Forms of Welfare Capitalism and Education-Based Participatory Inequality.” Socio-Economic Review (2014) 12(2): 437-62

Recommended:

• 18.3.4. Corinne Bara, “Incentives and Opportunities: A Complexity-Oriented Explanation of Violent Ethnic Conflict.” Journal of Peace Research (2014) 51(6): 696–710.


Tuesday, June 22 Module 19 Designing and Conducting Fieldwork: Collecting and Analyzing Data – Diana Kapiszewski and Lauren MacLean

This module discusses a range of data-collection techniques as well as strategies for engaging in analysis in the field. Each session of this module is conducted with the understanding that participants have carefully read the assigned materials.  The instructors will present key points drawing on the readings and their collective experiences in managing fieldwork’s diverse challenges, and will then facilitate discussion of concepts and ideas in small and large groups.  Students will also have an opportunity to practice using the data-collection techniques discussed and research tools presented.

8:30am - 10:00am More-Interactive Forms of Data Collection 
Diana Kapiszewski, Georgetown University
Lauren M. MacLean, Indiana University

This session considers the differences among, unique features of, and benefits and challenges inherent in employing several more-interactive forms of data collection including participant observation, ethnography, surveys, and experiments. 

• 19.1.1. Diana Kapiszewski, Lauren M. MacLean, and Benjamin L. Read, “Site-Intensive Methods: Ethnography and Participant Observation,” Chapter Seven in Field Research in Political Science: Practices and Principles (Cambridge University Press, 2015). (Book to purchase)

• 19.1.2. Diana Kapiszewski, Lauren M. MacLean, and Benjamin L. Read, “Surveys in the Context of Field Research,” Chapter Eight in Field Research in Political Science: Practices and Principles (Cambridge University Press, 2015).  (Book to purchase)

• 19.1.3. Diana Kapiszewski, Lauren M. MacLean, and Benjamin L. Read, “Experiments in the Field,” Chapter Nine in Field Research in Political Science: Practices and Principles (Cambridge University Press, 2015).  (Book to purchase)

Recommended

• 19.1.4. Ellen Pader, “Seeing with an Ethnographic Sensibility: Explorations Beneath the Surface of Public Policies.” In Dvora Yanow and Peregrine Schwartz-Shea, eds., Interpretation and Method:  Empirical Research Methods and the Interpretive Turn (M.E. Sharpe, 2006). 

• 19.1.5. Lisa Wedeen, “Reflections on ethnographic work in political science,” Annual Review of Political Science 13:  255-272.

• 19.1.6. Jan Kubik, “Ethnography of Politics: Foundations, Applications, Prospects.” In Edward Schatz, ed., Political Ethnography (University of Chicago Press, 2009).

• 19.1.7. Henry E. Brady, “Contributions of Survey Research to Political Science,” PS: Political Science and Politics 33(1) (March 2000): 47-57.

• 19.1.8. Nora Cate Schaeffer and Stanley Presser, “The Science of Asking Questions,” Annual Review of Sociology 29(1) (December 2003): 65-88.

• 19.1.9. Seymour Sudman and Norman M. Bradburn, Asking Questions: A Practical Guide to Questionnaire Design (Jossey-Bass, 1982).  

• 19.1.10. Paluck, Elizabeth Levy, “The Promising Integration of Qualitative Methods and Field Experiments,” The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 628(1) (March 2010):  59-71.

10:15am - 10:45am Coffee Break.

10:45am - 12:30pm Research Design Discussion Sessions (not part of Module).

12: 30pm - 2:00pm  Lunch.

2:00pm - 3:30pm Interviewing 
Diana Kapiszewski, Georgetown University 
Lauren M. MacLean, Indiana University

This session explores various types of interviewing including one-on-one in-depth interviews, oral histories, and focus groups.  We consider the many challenges and opportunities that conducting interviews in the field entails and offer a range of practical advice.

• 19.2.1. Diana Kapiszewski, Lauren M. MacLean, and Benjamin L. Read, “Interviews, Oral Histories, and Focus Groups,” Chapter Six in Field Research in Political Science: Practices and Principles (Cambridge University Press, 2015).  (Book to purchase)

• 19.2.2. Erik Bleich and Robert Pekkanen, “How to Report Interview Data.”  In Layna Mosley, ed., Interview Research in Political Science (Cornell University Press, 2013). (Book to purchase)

• 19.2.3. Joe Soss, “Talking Our Way to Meaningful Explanations: A Practice-Centered View of Interviewing for Interpretive Research.” In Dvora Yanow and Peregrine Schwartz-Shea, eds., Interpretation and Method:  Empirical Research Methods and the Interpretive Turn (M.E. Sharpe, 2006). (Book to purchase)

Recommended

• 19.2.4. Beth Leech and Kenneth Goldstein, “Symposium: Interview Methods in Political Science,” PS: Political Science and Politics 35(4) (December 2002): 663-672.

• 19.2.5. Susan E. Short, Ellen Perecman, and Sara R. Curran, “Focus Groups.”  In Ellen Perecman and Sara Curran, eds., A Handbook for Social Science Field Research: Essays & Bibliographic Sources on Research Design and Methods (Sage, 2006).

• 19.2.6. Herbert Rubin and Irene Rubin, Qualitative Interviewing. The Art of Hearing Data, 2nd ed. (Sage, 2005), Chapters 6-9.

• 19.2.7. Oisin Tansey, “Process Tracing and Elite Interviewing: A Case for Non-Probability Sampling,” PS: Political Science and Politics 40(4) (October 2007):  765-772.

3:30pm - 4:00pm Coffee Break.

4:00pm - 5:30pm Analyzing, Re-Tooling, and Assessing Progress 
Diana Kapiszewski, Georgetown University 
Lauren M. MacLean, Indiana University

This session considers various strategies for engaging in data analysis, writing, and presenting initial findings to different audiences while conducting fieldwork. It also considers how fieldworkers can retool their project in the field and assess their progress.

• 19.3.1. Diana Kapiszewski, Lauren M. MacLean, and Benjamin L. Read, “Analyzing, Writing, and Retooling in the Field,” Chapter Ten in Field Research in Political Science: Practices and Principles (Cambridge University Press, 2015).  (Book to purchase)

• 19.3.2. Diana Kapiszewski, Lauren M. MacLean, and Benjamin L. Read, “Reconceptualizing Field Research,” Unpublished manuscript.

• 19.3.3. Robert Emerson, Rachel Fretz, and Linda Shaw, “Processing Fieldnotes: Coding and Memoing” in Writing Ethnographic Fieldnotes (University of Chicago Press, 1995). 

Recommended

• 19.3.4. Gilbert Shapiro and John Markoff, “A Matter of Definition.”  In Carl Roberts, ed., Text Analysis for the Social Sciences: Methods for Drawing Statistical Inferences from Texts and Transcripts (Lawrence Erlbaum, 1997). 

• 19.3.5. Rose McDermott et al., “Symposium: Data Collection and Collaboration,” PS: Political Science and Politics 43(1) (January 2010):  15-58. 


Wednesday, June 24 Module 20, Mixed-method research and causal mechanisms, part 1 – Nicholas Weller and Jeb Barnes

This module provides students with an introduction to the use of mixed-methods in the study of causal mechanisms.  We will address a variety of topics including: the role of quantitative and qualitative studies of causal mechanisms, how to use quantitative data to select promising cases, and how to use mixed-methods to improve measurement. 

8:45am - 10:15am Mixed and multi-method research: challenges and opportunities 

This session introduces participants to the appropriate role of mixed-method research in the context of studying causal mechanisms. We will focus on identifying the value-added of each component of mixed-methods research.

• 20.1.1. Nicholas Weller and Jeb Barnes, Finding Pathways: Mixed-Method Research for Studying Causal Mechanisms (Cambridge University Press, 2014), Chapters 1-2. (Book to purchase)

• 20.1.2 Stephen Morgan and Christopher Winship, Counterfactuals and Causal Inference. (Cambridge University Press, 2007). Chapter 2.

• 20.1.3. John Gerring, “Causal Mechanisms: Yes, But...,” Comparative Political Studies 43(11) (November 2010): 1499-1526.

Recommended

• 20.1.4. John Gerring, “Is There a (Viable) Crucial-Case Method?,” Comparative Political Studies 40(3) (March 2007): 231-253.

10:15-10:45am  Coffee Break

10:45am-12.30pm Research Design Discussion Sessions

12: 30pm – 2:00pm Lunch

2:00pm – 3:30pm Selecting Cases for Pathway Analysis

This session will provide present a set of general steps for selecting cases for pathway analysis that guides scholars towards how to read the relevant literature, how to identify relevant research questions, and how to think about the types of cases that are relevant given the extant literature and research questions.
 
• 20.2.1. Nicholas Weller and Jeb Barnes, Finding Pathways: Mixed-Method Research for Studying Causal Mechanisms (Cambridge University Press, 2014), Chapter 3-4. (Book to purchase)


• 20.2.2. Jason Seawright and John Gerring, “Case Selection Techniques in Case Study Research: A Menu of Qualitative and Quantitative Options,” Political Research Quarterly 61(2) (June 2008): 294-308.

Recommended

• 20.2.3. Derek Beach and Rasmus Brun Pedersen, “Case Selection Techniques in Process-Tracing and the Implications of Taking the Study of Causal Mechanisms Seriously.” Working Paper (2012). 

3:30pm - 4:00pm Coffee Break

4:00pm - 5:30pm Case selection using regression

This session introduces participants to the use of regression to select cases. We discuss both the benefits and the pitfalls of this approach, and we will walk through multiple examples. The examples include both cross-sectional data and panel data so that we can explore case selection in both instances.

• 20.3.1. Nicholas Weller and Jeb Barnes, Finding Pathways: Mixed-Method Research for Studying Causal Mechanisms (Cambridge University Press, 2014), Chapter 4-5. Chapter 4 is germane to both sessions 20.2 and 20.3. (Book to purchase)

• 20.3.2. Kenneth F. Schulz and David A Grimes, “Case-control studies: research in reverse,” Lancet 359(9304) (February 2002): 431-434


Wednesday, June 24 Module 21, CAQDAS I introduction to Atlas.ti – Robert Rubinstein


Overall Description

In this module participants will be introduced to atlas.ti for qualitative data analysis. The module will present the program and the general principles of its design. Using a sample project, participants will use the program to set up a research project for analysis and work with the data management functions of the software. Participants will explore the different ways atlas.ti facilitates the coding of project data, and how atlas.ti supports analysis of research materials.  They will practice querying and producing a variety of outputs from a sample project. 

On the second day of the module participants will set up an atlas.ti project, begin coding, and analysis with their own data sets. Although one can work with sample projects throughout, to get the most out of this module participants should bring with them material from their own research.  These can be interview transcripts, observational notes, documents and reports, or focus group documents. 

This is not an introduction to a particular style of research or coding, so participants should come with an idea as to which approach to data coding and analysis they plan to use for their project.  On the second day of the module participants will work collectively and individually to create, code, query, and report information from their projects.

The articles listed below are useful background:

• Nancy L. Leech and Anthony J. Onwuegbuzie 2007. An Array of Qualitative Data Analysis Tools: A Call for Data Triangulation, School Psychology Quarterly 22(4): 557-584.
• Janis Marshall and Harris L. Friedman 2012. Human versus Computer-Aided Qualitative Data Analysis Ratings: Spiritual Content in Dream Reports and Diary Entries, The Humanistic Psychologist 40: 329-342.
• Matthew B. Miles, A. Michael Huberman, and Johnny Saldaña 2014 Chapter 4: Fundamentals of Qualitative Data Analysis, in Qualitative Data Analysis: A Methods Sourcebook, 3rd Edition. London, UK: Sage Publications, Pp. 69-104.
• Jonny Saldaña, 2013.  Chapter 1: An Introduction to Codes and Coding, and Appendix A: A Glossary of Coding Methods, in The Coding Manual for Qualitative Researchers, 2nd Edition. London, UK: Sage Publications, Pp. 1-40 and Pp. 261-268.
• David Silverman, 2014. Chapter 5: Data Analysis, in Interpreting Qualitative Data, 5th Edition. London, UK: Sage Publications, Pp. 110-137

8:45am - 10:15am / Session 1 Why CAQDA / Meet atlas.ti

We will discuss the ways in which computer assisted qualitative analysis both reflects and improves upon traditional approaches to qualitative data analysis. We will then turn to looking at how atlas.ti in particular does this.  During this first session we will explore the particular language used by atlas.ti and discuss issues of database management. We will set up a project and enter sample data into it.

What is atlas.ti
Terminology particular to atlas.ti
Organization of an atlas.ti project: The Hermeneutic Unit
Getting data into the HU—Primary Documents (PDs)
Working with PDs

10:15am - 10:45am Coffee Break.

10:45am - 12:30pm Research Design Discussion Sessions (not part of Module).

12: 30pm - 2:00pm  Lunch.

2:00pm-3:00pm / Session 3
In this portion of the module we will continue working with database entry and management. We will explore the different objects that atlas.ti allows one to create—documents, codes, quotations, and memos. We will practice using the object managers to create primary document groupings, called families. Working with the primary document manager introduces skills that apply to the creation of other kinds of families.  We will begin exploring the processes that atlas.ti makes available for classifying data, looking at the underlying logic used, and practicing with these tools.

Creating document families
Coding in atlas.ti
Word Cruncher
The code manager
Free quotations
Codes
Auto coding

3:30pm-4:00pm / Coffee Break

4:00pm-5:30pm / Session 4  
We continue exploring the ways in which codes are implemented in atlas.ti and discuss and practice organizing codes to facilitate data exploration. During this portion of the module we will begin using some of the tools that atlas.ti provides for investigating patterns within a dataset, and which support the development of analytic analyses.  We will create reports using these tools.  We will begin working with the Query Tool which allows for the construction of complex queries of the dataset.  At the end of the day we will conclude by preparing our sample projects so that can be safely transferred to other computers.

Codes and code books 
Structuring codes / coding schemes
Simple retrieval 
Creating reports
Primary document-Code concurrence 
Exploring the Query Tool: Complex retrieval
The Copy Bundle 


Wednesday, June 24, Module 22 Geographic Information Systems I: Introduction to GIS as a Qualitative Research Method – Jonnell Robinson

8:30am - 10:00am Introduction and Case Studies in Qualitative GIS
Jonnell Robinson, Syracuse University

This session will introduce participants to GIS as a tool for qualitative research, present basic GIS terminology and concepts and the basic functions of ESRI’s ArcGIS software suite, particularly those functions that are most commonly used by social scientists.

• 22.1.1. Samuel F. Dennis Jr. “Prospects for qualitative GIS at the intersection of youth.” Environment and Planning A. 38. (2006): 2039-2054. Web. 4 Apr. 2015.

• 22.1.2. National Geographic. “Geographic Information Systems” http://education.nationalgeographic.com/education/encyclopedia/geographic-information-system-gis/?ar_a=1. Web. 4 Apr. 2015.
.  
• 22.1.3. Sam Sturgis. “Kids in India are sparking urban planning changes by mapping slums.” The Atlantic City Lab. Feb 19, 2015.

• 22.1.4. Pamela Wridt. “A qualitative GIS approach to mapping urban neighborhoods with children to promote physical activity and child-friendly community planning.” Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design. 37. (2010): 129-147. Web. 4 Apr. 2014.

Further:

• 22.1.5. Meghan Cope and Sarah Elwood. Qualitative GIS: A Mixed Methods Approach. Thousand Oaks, California: SAGE Publications Inc., 2009. Print.

• 22.1.6. William J. Craig, Trevor M. Harris, and Weiner Daniel. Community Participation and Geographic Information Systems. London/ New York, New York: Taylor & Francis Inc., 2002. Print.
• 22.1.7. Steven J. Steinberg. GIS: Geographic Information Systems for the Social Sciences: Investigating Space and Place. Thousand Oaks, California: SAGE Publications, 2006. Print.

10:15am - 10:45am Coffee Break.

10:45am - 12:30pm Research Design Discussion Sessions (not part of Module).

12: 30pm - 2:00pm  Lunch.

2:00pm - 3:30pm Basic GIS Functions 
Jonnell Robinson, Syracuse University

This module will explore basic visualization and analytical functions such as building and querying attribute tables, selecting map features, and symbolizing data.

• 22.2.1. Michael Batty. 2003. “Using Geographical Information Systems.” In Key Methods in Geography, edited by Nicholas J. Clifford and Gill Valentine, 409-423. London: SAGE Publications.

• 22.2.2. Juliana Maantay and John Ziegler. 2006. GIS for the Urban Environment. Redlands: ESRI Press. Read Pages 8-19 and 57-86. 

• 22.2.3. Andy Mitchell. 1999. The ESRI Guide to GIS Analysis. Volume 1: Geographic Patterns and Relationships. Redlands: Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc. Read Pages 9-19.

Recommended

• 22.2.4. David Allen. GIS Tutorial 2: Spatial Analysis Workbook, 10.1 Edition. Redlands, California: ESRI Press Inc., 2013. Print..

• 22.2.5. David W. Allen and Jeffery M. Coffey. GIS Tutorial 3: Advanced Workbook, 10.0 Edition. Redlands, California: ESRI Press Inc., 2010. Print.).

• 22.2.6. Gorr L. Wilpen and Kristen S. Kurland. GIS Tutorial 1: Basics Workbook, 10.1. Edition. Redlands, California: ESRI Press Inc., 2013. Print..

3:30pm - 4:00pm Coffee Break.

4:00pm - 5:30pm GIS Data Sources and Data Integration
Jonnell Robinson, Syracuse University

This session will review the types and sources of data that are available for GIS users working in both data rich and data poor settings, the ethics of using mapping in research, how metadata can be used to communicate qualitative information, and data overlay analysis.

• 22.3.1. Jin-Kyu Jung and Sarah Elwood. “Extending the qualitative capabilities of GIS.” Transactions in GIS. 14. (2010): 63-87. Web. 4 Apr. 2015.  

• 22.3.2. Giacomo Rambaldi, Robert Chambers, Mike McCall and Jefferson Fox. 2006. “Practical Ethics for PGIS Practitioners, Facilitators, Technology Intermediaries and Researchers.” In Participatory Learning and Action, 106-113.

• 22.3.3. Steven J. Steinberg and Sheila L. Steinberg. 2006. GIS for the Social Sciences: Investigating Place and Space. Thousand Oaks: SAGE Publications. Read Chapter 2. 

Recommended

• 22.3.4. Ian N. Gregory, A Place in History: A guide to using GIS in historical research. 2nd. Belfast, Northern Ireland: Centre for Data Digitisation and Analysis, 2005. Web. 4 Apr. 2014

• 22.3.5. Mark Monmonier. How to Lie With Maps. 2. Chicago, Illinois: University of Chicago Press, 1996. Print.


Wednesday, June 24, Module 23 Interpretation and History, part 1 – Thomas Dodman and Daragh Grant

Discourse Analysis and Intellectual History
(This module is based, in part, on a session offered in previous years by Professor Jennifer Pitts.)
Thomas Dodman, Boston College and Daragh Grant, University of Chicago

This module introduces students to methods of discourse analysis employed by political theorists and historians of political thought and to critical approaches to intellectual history. Building on earlier modules on discourse analysis, participants will learn different approaches to “reading” texts, and will examine debates over meaning, concepts, context, and the explanation of historical change, as well as engaging with ongoing debates about the politics of historiography. The three sessions are structured around the techniques of the Cambridge school and Bourdieu’s critique of them; the German tradition of Begriffsgeschichte (concept history); and readings of historical texts from the standpoint of a critique of the present.

In both modules on Interpretation and History, we will aim to situate the readings in relationship to the specific research needs of students taking the module. With that in mind, it would be helpful for students to come to the first session prepared to briefly describe the role that historical or archival research is likely to play in their dissertation.

8:45am - 10:15am Session 1: Cambridge school and its critique
Thomas Dodman, Boston College and Daragh Grant, University of Chicago

This session considers the so-called “linguistic turn” in the history of political thought, by introducing participants to the work of Quentin Skinner and the Cambridge school of intellectual history, as well as to the work of Pierre Bourdieu. We will consider, among other things, how one goes about reconstructing the questions that a given author is asking? what are illocutionary acts and why do they matter? to what extent are texts and the ideas they formulate related to specific historical contexts? and how do texts relate to practices of power and domination?

• 23.1.1 Quentin Skinner, “Meaning and Understanding in the History of Ideas,” History and Theory, 8 (1969): 3-53

• 23.1.2 Pierre Bourdieu, Language and Symbolic Power, ed. by John Thompson, trans. by Gino Raymond and Matthew Adamson (Cambridge: Polity, 1991), 107-137

Recommended

• 23.1.3 J.L. Austin, How to do Things with Words (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1962)

• 23.1.4 R. G. Collingwood, An Autobiography (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1951), 27-43

• 23.1.5 Quentin Skinner, “The rise of, challenge to, and prospects for a Collingwoodian approach to the history of political thought,” in The History of Political Thought in National Context, eds. Dario Castiglione and Iain Hampsher-Monk (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001), 175-88

10:15am - 10:45am Coffee Break.

10:45am - 12:30pm Research Design Discussion Sessions (not part of Module).

12: 30pm - 2:00pm Lunch.

2:00pm - 3:30pm Session 2: Begriffsgeschichte
Thomas Dodman, Boston College and Daragh Grant, University of Chicago

This session introduces participants to the work of Reinhardt Koselleck and the techniques of Begriffsgeschichte (or concept history). What is a concept? how does it come into being? and in what relation to the social world? These are some of the questions we will consider in looking at a programmatic statement and application of Begriffsgeschichte, trying to ascertain what are the advantages and limitations of this approach to discourse analysis. 

• 23.2.1 Reinhardt Koselleck, “Begriffsgeschichte and Social History,” in Futures Past: On the Semantics of Historical Time, trans. by Keith Tribe (New York: Columbia University Press, 2004), 75-92

• 23.2.2 Reinhardt Koselleck, “Progress and Decline: An appendix to the history of two concepts,” in The Practice of Conceptual History: Timing History, Spacing Concepts, trans. by Todd Samuel Presner and others (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2002), 218-235

Recommended

• 23.2.3 Melvin Richter, “Begriffsgeschichte and the History of Ideas,” Journal of the History of Ideas, 48 (1987): 247-263

3:30pm - 4:00pm Coffee Break.

4:00pm - 5:30pm Intellectual history and the present
Thomas Dodman, Boston College and Daragh Grant, University of Chicago

This session looks at two different ways of doing intellectual history with an eye to a critique of the present. Dominick LaCapra’s seminal article introduces participants to how deconstruction and psychoanalysis can enhance our critical reading of texts in dialogue with the present. David Scott’s recent book tries to harness the methods of Skinner and Koselleck covered in the two previous sessions to offer an epistemological reflection on the work of the historian as a historical actor him/herself. 

• 23.3.1 Dominick LaCapra, “Rethinking Intellectual History and Reading Texts,” in Rethinking Intellectual History: Texts, Contexts, Language (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1983), 47-85

• 23.3.2 David Scott, Conscripts of Modernity: The Tragedy of Colonial Enlightenment (Durham: Duke University Press, 2004), 1-57


Thursday, June 25 Module 24 Mixed-method research and causal mechanisms, part 2– Nicholas Weller and Jeb Barnes

This module continues with the material from Part 1 (Module 21). 

8:45am - 10:15am  Case selection using matching

This session introduces participants to the use of matching as a way to select cases for mixed-methods research. We will discuss matching at a general level and then turn to how to use matching to select cases.

• 24.1.1. Nicholas Weller and Jeb Barnes, Finding Pathways: Mixed-Method Research for Studying Causal Mechanisms (Cambridge University Press, 2014), Chapter 6. (Book to purchase)

• 24.1.2. Elizabeth Stuart, “Matching Methods for Causal Inference: A Review and a Look Forward,” Statistical Science 25(1) (February 2010): 1-21.

Recommended

• 24.1.3. Richard Nielsen, “Case Selection via Matching,” Sociological Methods and Research (forthcoming). 

10:15-10:45am  Coffee Break

10:45am-12.30pm Research Design Discussion Sessions

12: 30pm – 2:00pm Lunch

2:00pm – 3:30pm Contextualizing and extending prior research

This session will discuss how to use large-N methods to conceptualize prior research when scholars are building directly on results from other studies.  In particular, we will consider issues related to knowledge accumulation across multiple case studies.
 
• 24.2.1. Nicholas Weller and Jeb Barnes, Finding Pathways: Mixed-Method Research for Studying Causal Mechanisms (Cambridge University Press, 2014), Chapters 7-8. (Book to purchase)

• 24.2.2. Michael Ross, “How Do Natural Resources Influence Civil War? Evidence from Thirteen Cases,” International Organization 58(1) (Winter 2004): 35-67.

Recommended

• 24.2.3. Karen Luftey and Jeremy Freese, “Toward Some Fundamentals of Fundamental Causality. Socioeconomic Status and Health in Routine Clinic Visit for Diabetes,” American Journal of Sociology 110(5) (March 2005):1326-1372

3:30pm - 4:00pm Coffee Break

4:00pm - 5:30pm Pathway analysis/mixed method research and measurement

This session introduces participants to use of mixed-method research in measurement.  We will review the basic concerns related to measurement and then delve in to a variety of ways that mixed-methods research can improve our ability to measure nettlesome concepts. 

• 24.3.1. Gerardo Munck and Jay Verkulien, “Conceptualizing and Measuring Democracy: Evaluating Alternative Indices,” Comparative Political Studies 35(1) (February 2002): 5-34.

• 24.3.2. Chapter 4 from Statistics in Political Science, read the entire chapter; focus on pp. 82-90 and 104-107.

Recommended

• 24.3.3. Jeb Barnes and Thomas F. Burke, “Making Way: Legal Mobilization, Organizational Response, and Wheelchair Access,” Law & Society Review 46(1) (March 2012): 167-198


Thursday, June 25, Module 25 CAQDAS II  Introduction to Atlas.ti — Robert Rubinstein

8:45am - 10:15am / Session 1  

atlas.ti provides a variety of tools for enhancing the analytic engagement with one’s dataset.  We will use some of those tools in this portion of the module.  We will continue looking at the Query Tool, and then consider how the process of creating memos can support a researcher’s analytic processes. We will use memos to create a record of our theoretical thinking, explore how memos can be used as field journal, and discuss other uses of memos.  We will explore more complex way of working with codes, and if time permits we will explore some of the theory building capacities in atlas.ti, especially the ability to visualize data through the construction of semantic networks.

Working with memos
Working with families and codes
Networks and theory building
Advance features

10:15am - 10:45am Coffee Break.

10:45am - 12:30pm Research Design Discussion Sessions (not part of Module).

12: 30pm - 2:00pm Lunch.

2:00pm-3:00pm / Session 3

During the final two sessions of this module participants will work on their own research projects.  Although this is not a workshop on research design or how to code, it will be useful for participants to discuss their coding approaches and project designs with one another. Participants will work on their projects, and will have the opportunity to consult with one another about strategies for implementing atlas.ti for their research. 

Create atlas.ti projects for individual research projects
Collective discussion of project structures
Approaches to coding

3:30pm-4:00pm / Coffee Break

 4:00pm-5:30pm / Session 4  
Work with individual projects
Create initial reports


Thursday, June 25 Module 26, Geographic Information Systems II – Exploring Analytic Capabilities, Jonnell Robinson

8:45am - 10:15am  Open Source Mapping Tools
Jonnell Robinson, Syracuse University

This session will introduce open source geovisualization and analysis tools including Open Street Map, Google My Maps, and QGIS.

• 26.1.1. Mordechia Haklay and Patrick Weber. “OpenStreetMap: User-Generated Street Maps”. Pervasive Computing. 2008: 7(4) 12-18. http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/stamp/stamp.jsp?tp=&arnumber=4653466 (accessed April 2015).

• 26.1.2. Sophia B. Liu and Leysia Palen. “The New Cartographers: Crisis Map Mashups and the Emergence of Neogeographic Practice.” Cartography and Geographic Information Science 2010: 37(1) 69-90.

• 26.1.3. Stefan Steiniger and Erwan Bocher. “An Overview on Current Free and Open Source Desktop GIS Developments. International Journal of Geographical Information Science. 2009:23(10) 1345-1370.

Further Readings

• 26.1.4. Sarah Elwood, Michael F. Goodchild and Daniel Z. Sui. “Researching Volunteered Geographic Information: Spatial Data, Geographic Research, and New Social Practice.” Annals of the Association of American Geographers 2012:102(3) 571-590.

10:15am - 10:45am Coffee Break.

10:45am - 12:30pm Research Design Discussion Sessions (not part of Module).

12: 30pm - 2:00pm Lunch.

2:00pm – 3:30pm GIS Data Collection: Digitizing Archival Maps, Collecting GPS Point Locations, Counter and Sketch Mapping, and Spatial Data Repositories
Jonnell Robinson, Syracuse University

This session will demonstrate valuable data collection techniques for archival research, field work, participatory and community-based mapping, as well as the availability and accessibility of spatial data through data repositories. “Heads-up” digitizing, or turning print maps into a digital GIS map, integrating GPS receiver data into GIS, and sketch map digitization will be demonstrated. Downloading spatial data from web-based repositories for integration into GIS will also be discussed. 

• 26.2.1 Lynn Heasley, “Shifting Boundaries on a Wisconsin Landscape: Can GIS Help Historians Tell a Complicated Story?” Human Ecology. 2003;31(2) 183-213. 

• 26.2.2. Nancy Lee Peluso. “Whose Woods are These? Counter-Mapping Forest Territories in Kalimantan, Indonesia.” Antipode 1995:27(4) 383-406

Further Readings

• 26.2.3.  William J. Craig, Trevor M. Harris, and Weiner Daniel. Community Participation and Geographic Information Systems. London/ New York, New York: Taylor & Francis Inc., 2002. Print.

• 26.2.4. Ian N. Gregory, A Place in History: A guide to using GIS in historical research. 2nd. Belfast, Northern Ireland: Centre for Data Digitisation and Analysis, 2005. http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Ian_Gregory2/publication/228725974_A_place_in_history_A_guide_to_using_GIS_in_historical_research/links/547726620cf29afed614470b.pdf.  (accessed April 2015).

• 26.2.5. John Pickles, Ground Truth: The Social Implications of Geographic Information Systems. New York, New York: The Guilford Press, 1995. Print.

• 26.2.6. Denis Wood, The Power of Maps. New York, New York: The Guilford Press, 1992. Print.

3:30pm - 4:00pm Coffee Break

4:00pm - 5:30pm Map Design
Jonnell Robinson, Syracuse University

This session will provide an overview of basic map design, integrating narrative and photos with GIS, and a discussion about why, how and where to further hone GIS skills. 

• 26.3.1. Aileen Buckley, Kenneth Field, and Esri. “Making a Meaningful Map.” ESRI - GIS Mapping Software, Solutions, Services, Map Apps, and Data. http://www.esri.com/news/arcuser/0911/making-a-map-meaningful.html (accessed April 2015). 

Further Readings 

• 26.3.2. Cynthia A. Brewer,  Designing better maps: a guide for GIS users. Redlands, California: ESRI Press, Inc., 2005.

• 26.3.3. Heather MacDonald and Alan Peters. Urban Policy and the Census. Redlands, California: ESRI Press, Inc. 2011. Print.

• 26.3.4. Andy Mitchell, The ESRI Guide to GIS Analysis: Geographic Patterns & Relationships. 1. Redlands, California: ESRI Press, Inc., 1999. Print.

• 26.3.5. Andy Mitchell, The ESRI Guide to GIS Analysis: Spatial Measurements & Statistics. 2. Redlands, California: ESRI Press, Inc., 2005. Print.

• 26.3.6. Andy Mitchell, The ESRI Guide to GIS Analysis: Modeling Suitability, Movement, and Interaction. 3. Redlands, California: ESRI Press, Inc., 2012. Print.

• 26.3.7. Mark Monmonier, Mapping it Out: Expository Cartography for the Humanities and Social Sciences. Chicago, Illinois: University of Chicago Press, 1993. Print.


Thursday, June 25 Module 27 Interpretation and History II: Interpretive Methods for Archival and Historical Research– Thomas Dodman and Daragh Grant

This module introduces students to the challenges of working with materials drawn from different social, cultural, and historical settings, and explores creative interpretive strategies for addressing these challenges. Students will be introduced to the basics of the historical method, and will be encouraged to think about how a careful attention to questions of temporality and periodization can shape and reveal new avenues in their empirical research. All three sessions will be attentive to the problem of analyzing historical materials from the standpoint of the present. Shifting meanings over time, and transformations in the criteria for judgment, present particular problems for historical researchers. Students will be challenged to think about the problems posed by the use of familiar concepts like “culture” and “identity” against the background of processes of historical change that destabilize both the content and the contours of such concepts. Finally, in light of these challenges, students will be invited to think through the strategies available for working in a partial archive, with attention to the virtues and pitfalls of creatively thinking about historical source materials.

8:45am - 10:15am Session 1: History as social science: The study of structures and 
Thomas Dodman, Boston College and Daragh Grant, University of Chicago

This session introduces students to the historical method, highlighting two key challenges to the study of historical events. Students will begin the session by working in groups to identify their own archival challenges, specifically related to two questions. First, how does the problem of temporality enter their work? And second, how do the events they study refashion the very structures of the societies on which their research is centered? 

• 27.1.1 William H. Sewell Jr., “Historical Events as Transformations of Structures: Inventing Revolution at the Bastille,” in Logics of History: Social Theory and Social Transformation (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2005), 225-270

• 27.1.2 Marshall Sahlins, “Structure and History,” in Islands of History (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1985), 136-56

Recommended
• 27.1.3 William H. Sewell Jr., “A Theory of the Event: Marshall Sahlins’s ‘Possible Theory of History,’” in Logics of History, 197-224

• 27.1.4 William H. Sewell Jr.,, “History, Theory, and Social Science,” in Logics of History, 1-21 


• 27.1.5 William H. Sewell Jr.,, “Three Temporalities: Toward an Eventful Sociology,” in Logics of History, 81-123

10:15-10:45am  Coffee Break

10:45am-12.30pm Research Design Discussion Sessions

12:30pm – 2:00pm Lunch

2:00pm – 3:30pm Avoiding anachronism: Morality and Science as historical problems 
Thomas Dodman, Boston College and Daragh Grant, University of Chicago

This session address a further challenge posed by the study of historical change: namely, how one avoids the problem of anachronism generated by conceptual transformations that accompany worldly events. The readings address questions of scientism and morality. Although our discussion will be oriented around the readings for the session, students will be invited to discuss the kinds of concepts that are central to their own work, and to think collaboratively about how they might address the challenges posed by shifts in meaning across time.

• 27.2.1 Carlo Ginzburg, “Clues: Roots of a Scientific Paradigm,” Theory and Society 7 (1979): 273-88

• 27.2.2 Jan E. Goldstein, “Toward an Empirical History of Moral Thinking: The Case of Racial Theory in Mid-Nineteenth-Century France,” American Historical Review 120 (2015): 1-27

Recommended
• 27.2.3 Constantin Fasolt, The Limits of History (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2004)

• 27.2.4 Carlo Ginzburg, “Checking the Evidence: The Judge and the Historian,” Critical Inquiry 18 (1991): 79-92.

• 27.2.5 Jan E. Goldstein, Hysteria Complicated by Ecstasy: The Case of Nanette Leroux (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2011)

• 27.2.6 Michel-Rolph Trouillot, Silencing the Past: Power and the Production of History (Boston: Beacon Press, 1995)

3:30pm - 4:00pm Coffee Break

4:00pm - 5:30pm Possibilities and Pitfalls in the Archive 
Thomas Dodman, Boston College and Daragh Grant, University of Chicago

This session will introduce students to the particular opportunities and challenges that scholars are presented with when working in archives. The readings focus on how scholars should approach the archive itself and on the ways in which we ought to conceive of such seemingly endless accumulations of records amassed by the state for purposes that are at once varied and often at variance with the interests of scholars. We will examine questions of interpretation raised by such records as well as exploring how fleeting or fragmentary records might nevertheless yield a wealth of historical insights.

• 27.3.1 Arlette Farge, The Allure of the Archives, trans. Thomas Scott-Railton (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2013), 1-17, 26-32, 53-78, 94-113, 121-124. (Book to purchase)

• 27.3.2 Ann Laura Stoler, “Colonial Archives and the Arts of Governance,” Archival Science 2 (2002): 87-109

Recommended

• 27.3.3 Randolph Head, “Knowing the State: The Transformation of Political Knowledge in Swiss Archives, 1450-1770,” Journal of Modern History 75 (2003): 745-82

• 27.3.4 Joan W. Scott, “Evidence of Experience,” in Questions of Evidence: Proof, Practice, and Persuasion across the Disciplines, eds. James Chandler, Harry Harootunian and Arnold Davidson (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1994) 363-387

• 27.3.5 Ann Laura Stoler, Along the Archival Grain: Epistemic Anxieties and Colonial Common Sense (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2009)

• 27.3.6 Carolyn Steedman. “Something She Called a Fever: Michelet, Derrida, and Dust.” American Historical Review 106 (2001): 1159-80


Friday, June 26 Unified Sessions– Peter Feaver, Colin Elman, Brian Humes, John Ishiyama

U7 8.45am-10.00am Policy Relevance (unified session)
Peter Feaver, Duke University
 
• U.7.1. Peter Feaver, “Five myths about the policy-academy gap,” Foreign Policy, July 25, 2011.

• U.7.2. Daniel W. Drezner, “So you want to get a Ph.D. to get ahead in DC…” Foreign Policy, November 29, 2012. 

• U.7.3. Bruce W. Jentleson and Ely Ratner, “Bridging the Beltway–Ivory Tower Gap,” International Studies Review 2011 13(1): 6-11. 

10:00am - 10:30am Coffee Break

10:30am – 11.30am Obtaining Funding (unified session)
Brian Humes,   National Science Foundation

What are the features of successful grant proposals? This session offers guidelines designed to help you not only secure funding for your project but also use the proposal writing process to move forward in the research itself.

• U.8.1. Adam Przeworski and Frank Salomon, “On the Art of Writing Proposals: Some Candid Suggestions for Applicants to Social Science Research Council Competitions,” Social Science Research Council (1998). 

• U.8.2.Barry Weingast, “Structuring Your Papers (Caltech Rules),” Stanford University (April 1995, revised 2010).

U9 11:30am-12:30pm Getting Publishing (unified session)
John Ishiyama, Editor, American Political Science Review

On the writing and preparing:

• U.9.1. Stephen K. Donovan, “How to Alienate Your Editor: A Practical Guide for Established Authors,” Journal of Scholarly Publishing 36(4) (July 2005): 238-242. Read pp. 240-242.

• U.9.2. Stephen K. Donovan, “Putting Editors to Trouble (or People of That Sort).” Journal of Scholarly Publishing 41(1) (October 2009): 103-109.

• U.9.3. James A. Stimson, “Professional Writing in Political Science: A Highly Opinionated Essay.” Paper, University of North Carolina. Available at www.unc.edu/_jstimson/Writing.pdf. [Skip portions that are not relevant for you.]

On rejection:

• U.9.4. Stephen K. Donovan, “The Importance of Resubmitting Rejected Papers,” Journal of Scholarly Publishing 38(3) (April 2007): 151-155.

• U.9.5. Gregory Weeks, “Facing Failure: The Use (and Abuse) of Rejection in Political Science,” PS: Political Science and Politics 39(4) (October 2006): 876-882.

Also Recommended

• U.9.6. For reflections of a previous editor: Dina A. Zinnes, “Reflections of a Past Editor,” PS: Political Science and Politics 18(3) (July 1985): 607-612.

• U.9.7. Data (the quantitative kind): Michael S. Lewis-Beck and Dena Levy, “Correlates of Publication Success: Some AJPS Results,” PS: Political Science and Politics 26(3) (September 1993): 558-561.

12:30pm-2:00pm Lunch

U10 2:00pm - 3:30pm  Institute Conclusion 
Colin Elman, Syracuse University


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